Study finds no weekend effect in England's major trauma centres

October 28, 2016, University of Oxford
Study finds no weekend effect in England’s major trauma centres. Credit: University of Oxford

Patients admitted to NHS major trauma centres at the weekend have near identical outcomes to those admitted during the week, according to a new study of more than 49,000 patients published in the Emergency Medicine Journal.

NHS major trauma services in England show no signs of a 'weekend effect', Oxford University-led research has found.

Using data from all 22 major trauma centres (MTCs) in England, a team from Oxford, Liverpool, Manchester, Sheffield and Harvard universities looked for evidence that people who arrived at hospital on Saturday or Sunday had worse outcomes than those admitted on a weekday.

Lead researcher, Oxford University's Dr David Metcalfe, said: "Earlier studies raised the possibility that patients have worse outcomes when admitted to NHS hospitals at weekends.

'We wanted to know whether this is true for severely injured patients taken to specialist hospitals that have been configured to provide a similar level of service for injured patients on every day of the week.

'Severely injured patients in MTCs have access to on-site consultants, specialists, and supporting services like CT scanners and operating theatres at all times.'
The study, published in the Emergency Medicine Journal, used the comprehensive national database operated by the Trauma Audit and Research Network (TARN), which receives data from all 22 MTCs. It collects data on all patients with a severe injury who are admitted for at least three days or die after arriving at hospital.

The team found no differences in the proportion of patients that died or made a good recovery based on the day on which they arrived at hospital. Although the length of hospital stay for patients admitted on a weekday or a weekend during daytime was the same, those arriving at night on the weekend night had a slightly shorter length of stay.

Dr Metcalfe added: 'The TARN database is specifically designed to collect outcome data for severely injured patients and so we can be confident that there is no in this area. This is clearly good news for patients.'

Explore further: Study shows major omission in evidence of 'weekend effect' on mortality rates in hospitals

More information: David Metcalfe et al. Is there a 'weekend effect' in major trauma?, Emergency Medicine Journal (2016). DOI: 10.1136/emermed-2016-206049

Chris Moulton. That old weekend effect!, Emergency Medicine Journal (2016). DOI: 10.1136/emermed-2016-206226

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