Children need conventional CPR; black and Hispanic children more likely to get Hands-Only

November 12, 2016, American Heart Association

While compressions-only or Hands-Only CPR is as good as conventional CPR for adults, children benefit more from the conventional approach that includes rescue breaths. But black and Hispanic children are more likely to receive the compressions-only method, according to research presented at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2016.

Last year, Philadelphia researchers reported that bystander CPR on kids has increased and this year they report the comparison between conventional CPR attempts and Hands-Only attempts.

Using a large national registry in the United States, researchers examined the outcomes of out-of-hospital cardiac arrests in 18 years and younger. Of 1,458 arrests treated with bystander CPR between 2013-2015, 49 percent of children received conventional CPR, 50 percent were given compressions-only CPR, and 1 percent had ventilation-only CPR. Among the findings:

  • Compressions-only CPR was used more often in black children (56 percent) and Hispanic children (64 percent) than in white children (49 percent).
  • Although children were more likely to receive compressions-only CPR, their survival was better if they received conventional CPR.
  • Conventional CPR was associated with a 60 percent better chance of survival and a 50 percent better chance of being discharged from the hospital with good brain function.
  • Infants were more likely to receive conventional CPR, and that approach improved their survival more than compressions-only CPR.
  • Overall, survival was 17 percent for conventional CPR and 14 percent for compressions-only CPR.

The American Heart Association recommends conventional CPR (compressions and rescue breaths) for infants and children, but if rescuers are unwilling or unable to deliver breaths, they should perform compressions-only CPR.

Explore further: CPR from bystanders associated with better outcomes after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in pediatrics

Related Stories

CPR from bystanders associated with better outcomes after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in pediatrics

November 12, 2016
Receiving cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) from a bystander - compared with not - was associated with better overall and neurologically favorable survival for children and adolescents who had out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, ...

Bystander CPR on kids has increased, survival odds improve for some

November 10, 2015
Bystander CPR on kids is increasing and is improving survival from cardiac arrest outside the hospital, according to research presented at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2015.

Eliminating mouth-to-mouth boosts CPR results, study shows

December 10, 2012
(HealthDayNews)—Bystander CPR saves more lives when just chest compression is performed without mouth-to-mouth resuscitation, a new study from Japan shows.

CPR skills low among older adults

November 12, 2016
CPR increases the chance of survival after sudden cardiac arrest, yet knowledge of this life-saving procedure is low in many communities, especially among older adults, according to separate studies presented during the Resuscitation ...

Study compares outcomes of device for chest compressions vs manual CPR

November 17, 2013
Sten Rubertsson, M.D., Ph.D., of Uppsala University, Sweden and colleagues assessed whether cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in which chest compressions are delivered with a mechanical device would result in superior 4-hour ...

Recommended for you

Antibodies linked to heart attacks

October 23, 2018
Levels of antiphospholipid antibodies, which are associated with rheumatic diseases, are also elevated in myocardial infarction without any autoimmune co-morbidity, a study from Karolinska Institutet in Sweden published in ...

Poor oral health linked to higher blood pressure, worse blood pressure control

October 22, 2018
People with high blood pressure taking medication for their condition are more likely to benefit from the therapy if they have good oral health, according to new research in the American Heart Association's journal Hypertension.

No sweat required: Team finds hypertension treatment that mimics effect of exercise

October 16, 2018
Couch potatoes rejoice—there might be a way to get the blood pressure lowering benefits of exercise in pill form.

New model suggests cuffless, non-invasive blood pressure monitoring possible using pulse waves

October 16, 2018
A large team of researchers from several institutions in China and the U.S. has developed a model that suggests it should be possible to create a cuffless, non-invasive blood pressure monitor based on measuring pulse waves. ...

Why heart contractions are weaker in those with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

October 16, 2018
When a young athlete suddenly dies of a heart attack, chances are high that they suffer from familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Itis the most common genetic heart disease in the US and affects an estimated 1 in 500 ...

Novel genetic study sheds new light on risk of heart attack

October 12, 2018
Loss of a protein that regulates mitochondrial function can greatly increase the risk of myocardial infarction (heart attack), Vanderbilt scientists reported Oct. 3 in the journal eLife.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.