Confocal microscopy aids surgical removal of tumors from eyelid

December 27, 2016

(HealthDay)—Imaging using fluorescence confocal microscopy (FCM) analysis in the reflectance mode and with an "en face" scanning can control tumor margins of eyelid basal cell carcinoma (BCC) to optimize surgical management, according to a study published online Dec. 19 in Clinical & Experimental Ophthalmology.

Marine Espinasse, M.D., from University Hospital of St-Etienne in France, and colleagues evaluated the sensitivity and specificity of FCM for the presence of tumor-free margins in 41 patients undergoing excision of BCC of the eyelid. Histopathogical examination was later performed in order to compare the results of FCM in the reflectance mode and with a horizontal ("en face") scanning.

The researchers found that FCM results were consistent with histopathology in all cases. Tumor-free margins were seen in 40 out of 42 samples, yielding both a sensitivity and specificity for FCM of 100 percent.

"This procedure has the advantage on FCM performed in the fluorescent mode of not needing any contrast agent to examine the samples," the authors write.

Explore further: Reflectance confocal microscopy best IDs melanoma on head, neck

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