In Greece's tobacco culture, passive smoke a serious problem

In Greece's tobacco culture, passive smoke a serious problem
This is a Sunday, July 12, 2015 file photo of a man as he smokes a cigarette as he looks at daily newspapers displayed at a kiosk in central Athens. Nearly two-thirds of Greeks are inhaling someone else's tobacco smoke on a daily basis, making Greece the worst nation in the European Union in exposing its people to the health risks of passive smoking. The European Union's statistical office Eurostat said Wednesday Dec. 7, 2016 that 64.2 percent of Greeks suffered daily exposure to tobacco smoke indoors. (AP Photo/Petros Karadjias, File)

Nearly two-thirds of Greeks are inhaling someone else's tobacco smoke on a daily basis, making Greece the worst nation in the European Union in exposing its people to the health risks of passive smoking.

The European Union's statistical office Eurostat said Wednesday that 64.2 percent of Greeks suffered daily exposure to indoors. Second in the EU is Croatia with 44.7 percent, followed by Bulgaria with 40.5 percent. At the other end, Sweden best protects its people from with only 5.9 percent exposed, even better than Finland with 6.3 percent.

In a tally of EU smokers aged 15 and over, Bulgaria tops the rankings with 34.7 percent, ahead of Greece with 32.6 percent. Sweden only has 16.7 percent who smoke, with Britain the second-lowest with 17.2 percent.


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