Heat-activated penile implant might restore sexual function in men with ED

December 29, 2016 by Susan Lampert Smith
Heat-activated penile implant might restore sexual function in men with E.D.
The nitinol implant remains flaccid at body temperature. Credit: University of Wisconsin-Madison

The basic technology for penile implants hasn't improved much in 40 years.

But Brian Le, a new faculty member in the Department of Urology with a background in materials science, is hoping that a heat-activated memory metal called Nitinol (a nickel-titanium alloy) will create a better implant for men with erectile dysfunction.

His recent paper in the journal Urology, with colleagues Alberto Colombo and Kevin McKenna at Northwestern University and Kevin McVary at Southern Illinois University, drew strong interest from the English tabloids, which dubbed it "the bionic penis."

But restoring erectile function to men who have lost it due to cancer or other injury is no locker-room joke.

Le says his patients seek to have their sexual function restored for similar reasons as women who choose to have their breasts restored after .

"It's a survivorship issue – restoring function can help people feel whole in their bodies again," he says.

And there are plenty of men who need help. About 40 percent of men between the ages of 40 and 70 have some level of and about a third of them don't respond to drugs like Viagra.

Heat-activated penile implant might restore sexual function in men with E.D.
The implant can “remember” an expanded shape and return to that shape when heated. Credit: University of Wisconsin-Madison

It's a potentially large market, and one of the reasons Boston Scientific is supporting this research.

The current gold standard is an inflatable pump, but the surgery to implant it can be tricky, involving a reservoir of water and a pump. It can be awkward to use and have complications. A simpler solution is a malleable device, more popular in developing countries because the operation is simple and cheaper. The downside is a permanently erect penis and potential tissue damage.

Le's solution is a heat-activated exoskeleton of nitinol, a metal known for its superelastic properties and already in use in medical devices used for endovascular surgery.

In this case, the urologist could do a simplified operation to insert the nitinol implant, which remains flaccid at body temperature but can "remember" an expanded shape and return to that shape when heated. Le and collaborators at Southern Illinois University are currently working on a remote-control device that can be waved over the penis, using induction to heat the NiTi a few degrees above body temperature and ratcheting open the alloy prosthesis to expand the penis in length and girth.

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The most recent study tested the prosthesis's strength and ability to expand heated and contract when cooled back to body temperature. The memory metal did well on mechanical testing. Le estimates that if this research continues to meet its milestones it could come to market in five to 10 years.

"We're hoping that, with a better device, a better patient experience, and a simpler surgery, more urologists would perform this operation, and more patients would want to try the device," Le says.

Explore further: Case volume impacts re-op rates after penile prosthesis Sx

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6 comments

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tkonte
5 / 5 (1) Dec 29, 2016
How does this work if you are in Phoenix Arizona during the summer, hmm
retrosurf
not rated yet Dec 29, 2016
One could use neodymium magnets arranged in a hygienic ring, that when slipped over the penis would rest at its base. The engineered magnetic force pattern would engage a small clutch in the implant there that would facilitate the ratchet-based erection process described in the article.

You could call it a "lock ring".

Personally, I think a jackscrew mechanism, with an externally applied stator for the internal rotor arrangement might be more promising.
cantdrive85
1 / 5 (1) Dec 29, 2016
Obviously, cold water swimming would still raise certain concerns.

If one only needs to raise the temperature a few degrees above body temps then only an enthusiastic partner should be needed. This, however, would pose an issue with married men.

As a side note, I always assumed the next step in penile implants was going to be an analog of Reebok's pump shoes, using the scrotum as the pump. The biggest concern there, of course, is that some women may consider it a foot pump.
TheGhostofOtto1923
3 / 5 (2) Dec 30, 2016
One could use neodymium magnets arranged in a hygienic ring, that when slipped over the penis would rest at its base. The engineered magnetic force pattern would engage a small clutch in the implant there that would facilitate the ratchet-based erection process described in the article
Sounds noisy but I suppose steampunks would love it. Maybe it could give off vapors.
carbon_unit
2.3 / 5 (3) Dec 31, 2016
"If you are going to be in a hot environment for more than 4 hours, consult your doctor."
adam_russell_9615
Dec 31, 2016
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