Most postpartum moms OK with self-administered pain meds

December 27, 2016

(HealthDay)—There is high satisfaction for a postpartum self-administered medication (SAM) program on postpartum wards, according to a study published online Dec. 20 in the Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice.

Hugo Schérer, Pharm.D., from the Université de Montréal, and colleagues conducted a prospective mixed methods survey in a mother-and-child tertiary center. Included in the survey were women enrolled in the postpartum SAM program who had a live newborn. Newborns cohabited with their mother during their hospitalization and received breast milk once or more. Data were included for 314 mothers and 263 breastfed .

The researchers found that 97 percent of SAM users appreciated the program. There was an 80 percent self-reported median overall improvement in pain. Traditional drug dispensing by the nurse would have been preferred by 18 percent of users who delivered vaginally and 32 percent who delivered via cesarean section (P = 0.009). Generally, drugs used in the SAM program were well tolerated. No worrisome adverse drug events were reported in the medical charts of newborns.

"The results suggest that the SAM program should remain a standard practice in our institution," the authors write. "Some recommendations will be drawn to better tailor the SAM program to the needs expressed by the users."

Explore further: Children born by cesarean section may have a greater risk of obesity

More information: Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

Misoprostol doesn't cut risk of postpartum hemorrhage

September 20, 2016

(HealthDay)—For women in the third stage of labor, misoprostol administered with routine oxytocin does not reduce the rate of postpartum hemorrhage, according to a study published online Sept. 5 in Obstetrics & Gynecology.

Postpartum women prefer delayed physician rounding

July 20, 2016

(HealthDay)—Delayed physician rounding increases postpartum women's satisfaction with their hospital experience and patient-physician communication, according to a study published in the August issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

Maternal depression up at four years postpartum

February 2, 2015

(HealthDay)—Maternal depression is more common at four years postpartum than at any point during the first 12 months postpartum, and is more likely among women with only one child at four years postpartum, according to ...

Recommended for you

Study shows there's a positive side to worrying

April 27, 2017

Worry - it does a body good. And, the mind as well. A new paper by Kate Sweeny, psychology professor at the University of California, Riverside, argues there's an upside to worrying.

Study links cannabis use in adolescence to schizophrenia

April 26, 2017

Scientists believe that schizophrenia, a disorder caused by an imbalance in the brain's chemical reactions, is triggered by a genetic interaction with environmental factors. A new Tel Aviv University study published in Human ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.