New research examines trends in radiology journal publications relating to patient-centered care

January 3, 2017, Harvey L. Neiman Health Policy Institute

New research reports that the number of articles within radiology journals designated as dealing with patient-centered care has increased substantially in recent years, although a very limited number of radiology journals have published multiple original research articles on the topic. The study, supported by research grants from the Harvey L. Neiman Health Policy Institute, is published online in the Journal of the American College of Radiology (JACR).

The researchers searched PubMed for articles in radiology journals for which the article's record referenced patient-centered/patient-centric care. A total of 115 articles in radiology journals were identified, including 40 original research articles. The number of articles annually ranged from zero to four from 2000 through 2008, five to nine from 2010 through 2012, 14 to 15 from 2013 through 2014, and 25 in 2015. Only four radiology journals had published more than one of the original research articles.

"We found that the most common themes of those 40 articles were optimization of ' access to reports and images; patients' experience in undergoing the examination; image evaluation; and radiologists meeting with patients," noted Andrew Rosenkrantz, MD, MPA, lead study author and a Neiman Institute affiliate research fellow. "We also found some of the studies dealt with less clearly patient-centric topics such as examination interpretation."

Rosenkrantz, an associate professor of radiology at NYU Langone Medical Center, added that one of the original research articles involved patients in educating trainees regarding patient-centered care. Otherwise, no original research article involved patients in system-level decisions regarding health care design and delivery.

"Including patients and families in what we do as radiologists is just the right thing to do. It enables better care for our patients and a better experience for them and their families. It's about a very different bottom line-engaging patients in their own care," said James V. Rawson, MD, FACR, a member of the Neiman Institute's advisory board and chair of radiology at the Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University. "Increased visibility of this important topic in our professional journals will help disseminate best practices."

Explore further: Report examines MACRA's impact on radiologists

More information: Andrew B. Rosenkrantz et al. Trends in Publications in Radiology Journals Designated as Relating to Patient-Centered Care, Journal of the American College of Radiology (2016). DOI: 10.1016/j.jacr.2016.09.016

Related Stories

Report examines MACRA's impact on radiologists

December 28, 2016
A new Harvey L. Neiman Health Policy Institute series of reports explores the impact of the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act (MACRA) of 2015, along with the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services' (CMS) 2016 ...

New research explores patients' satisfaction with their radiologists

November 29, 2016
According to a new research study, most U.S. radiologists receive favorable satisfaction scores from their patients. The abstract, funded by the Harvey L. Neiman Health Policy Institute, was presented at the 102nd Scientific ...

New Neiman Health Policy Institute report examines radiology payment models

July 14, 2016
A new Harvey L. Neiman Health Policy Institute report discusses the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act (MACRA) and its implications for radiology. The two-part series, supported by the Neiman Institute through American ...

New study evaluates national trends in enteral access procedures

November 23, 2016
According to a new study by the Harvey L. Neiman Health Policy Institute, the last two decades have seen a substantial decline in new enteral access procedures in the Medicare population. The study, published online in the ...

New report presents bundled payment model for breast cancer screening

August 18, 2016
According to a new report by the Harvey L. Neiman Health Policy Institute, mammography may present an opportunity for the expanded use of bundled payments in radiology. The study, published online in the Journal of the American ...

Clinician's exposure to basic science articles has significantly declined

February 5, 2016
Breaking up may not be that hard to do after all. A new report appearing in The FASEB Journal suggests that the once close relationship between basic science and clinical medicine appears to be on the rocks, as the number ...

Recommended for you

Calcium and Vitamin D supplements are not associated with risk of heart attacks

February 16, 2018
New research from the University of Southampton has found no association between the use of calcium or vitamin D supplementation and cardiovascular events such as heart attacks.

Study shows options to decrease risk of motor vehicle crashes for adolescent drivers

February 16, 2018
Adolescents who receive comprehensive and challenging on-road driving assessments prior to taking the license test might be protected from future motor vehicle crashes, according to a University of Alabama at Birmingham study ...

Being a single dad can shorten your life: study

February 15, 2018
The risk of dying prematurely more than doubles for single fathers compared to single mothers or paired-up dads, according to a study of Canadian families published Thursday.

Keeping an eye on the entire ageing process

February 15, 2018
Medical researchers often only focus on a single disease. As older people often suffer from multiple diseases at the same time, however, we need to rethink this approach, writes Ralph Müller.

Study suggests possible link between highly processed foods and cancer

February 14, 2018
A study published by The BMJ today reports a possible association between intake of highly processed ("ultra-processed") food in the diet and cancer.

Gov't says health costs to keep growing faster than economy

February 14, 2018
U.S. health care spending will keep growing faster than the overall economy in the foreseeable future, squeezing public insurance programs and employers who provide coverage, the government said Wednesday.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.