As America ages, new national poll will track key health issues for those over 50

June 19, 2017, University of Michigan

Nearly a third of U.S. adults have celebrated their 50th birthday - a sign of an aging nation. Now, a new poll based at the University of Michigan will take the pulse of this population on a wide range of health issues, and provide data and insights to inform healthcare policy, clinical practice, and future research.

Later this month, the U-M Institute for Healthcare Policy and Innovation (IHPI) will release the first results from the National Poll on Healthy Aging (NPHA), with data on prescription drug use for people between the ages of 50 and 80.

Directed by IHPI and sponsored by AARP and Michigan Medicine, U-M's academic medical center, the poll will issue new data 10 times a year focusing on key health-related issues facing older Americans.

IHPI's poll team, led by Preeti Malani, M.D., will tap into the perspectives of older adults and their caregivers using a national sample. The overall goal of the poll is to inform the public, , policymakers, and aging advocates on issues related to health, health care and health policy.

"In medicine, sometimes we focus so much on the latest research findings that we lose the individual patient voice. Yet there are gaps in our understanding of that cannot be filled with traditional medical research," says Malani, a professor of internal medicine at the U-M Medical School who specializes in infectious disease and geriatric medicine. "Some research studies can take years to complete. One of the most valuable aspects of this poll is that the results are available quickly and can provide timely insight into current issues."

The new National Poll on Healthy Aging, based at the University of Michigan's Institute for Healthcare Policy and Innovation, will release new results nearly every month starting in late June 2017. Credit: University of Michigan

Adds Alison Bryant, AARP Senior Vice President of Research, "We know research drives insights that affect our ability to impact behavior change. Our hope is that these polls will provide new information that will ultimately help older Americans adopt and maintain healthy behaviors."

The poll grew out of a strong interest in aging-related issues and policies among IHPI researchers, who include 510 members of the U-M faculty from a wide range of fields. The is modeled on U-M's highly successful C.S. Mott Children's Hospital National Poll on Children's Health, which for 10 years has provided new data every month on issues facing children, teens and parents.

Explore further: Most US adults say today's children have worse health than in past generations

More information: www.healthyagingpoll.org/

Related Stories

Most US adults say today's children have worse health than in past generations

April 18, 2016
More than half of adults believe children today are more stressed, experience less quality family time and have worse mental and emotional health than children in past generations, according to the C.S. Mott Children's Hospital ...

Will the doctor see your child now?

March 20, 2017
Parents often want medical advice when their child gets sick but only about half are very confident they can get a same day appointment with their child's provider, a new national poll finds.

Poll: Aging US in denial about long-term care need

April 24, 2013
(AP)—A new poll finds that Americans underestimate their chances of needing long-term care as they get older—and are taking few steps to get ready.

Parents of overweight kids more likely to give schools failing grades for fighting obesity

May 20, 2014
Parents – especially those of overweight children – give schools a failing grade for efforts to encourage healthy habits that combat childhood obesity, according to a new poll from the University of Michigan.

44 percent of adults worry e-cigarettes will encourage kids to start smoking tobacco

December 18, 2013
Adults nationwide are concerned about the use of e-cigarettes by children and teens, with 44 percent indicating worries that the devices will encourage kids to use tobacco products, according to a new poll from the University ...

Medical research needs kids, but two-thirds of parents unaware of opportunities

November 26, 2013
To improve healthcare for children, medical research that involves kids is a must. Yet, only five percent of parents say their children have ever participated in any type of medical research, according to a new University ...

Recommended for you

Women run faster after taking newly developed supplement, study finds

January 19, 2018
A new study found that women who took a specially prepared blend of minerals and nutrients for a month saw their 3-mile run times drop by almost a minute.

Americans are getting more sleep

January 19, 2018
Although more than one in three Americans still don't get enough sleep, a new analysis shows first signs of success in the fight for more shut eye. According to data from 181,335 respondents aged 15 and older who participated ...

Wine is good for you—to a point

January 18, 2018
The Mediterranean diet has become synonymous with healthy eating, but there's one thing in it that stands out: It's cool to drink wine.

Sleep better, lose weight?

January 17, 2018
(HealthDay)—Sleeplessness could cost you when it's time to stand on your bathroom scale, a new British study suggests.

Who uses phone apps to track sleep habits? Mostly the healthy and wealthy in US

January 16, 2018
The profile of most Americans who use popular mobile phone apps that track sleep habits is that they are relatively affluent, claim to eat well, and say they are in good health, even if some of them tend to smoke.

Improvements in mortality rates are slowed by rise in obesity in the United States

January 15, 2018
With countless medical advances and efforts to curb smoking, one might expect that life expectancy in the United States would improve. Yet according to recent studies, there's been a reduction in the rate of improvement in ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.