Bed sharing, maternal smoking raise risk of sudden unexpected death in infancy

June 6, 2017 by Anna Kellett, University of Auckland
Bed sharing, maternal smoking raise risk of sudden unexpected death in infancy
Credit: University of Auckland

The combination of bed sharing and maternal smoking is extremely hazardous for infants, giving rise to a 32-fold increase in the risk of sudden unexpected death in infancy (SUDI), new research has found.

The study, called "SUDI Nationwide Study", published in the New Zealand Medical Journal, involved a three year nationwide case-control study carried out between 1 March 2012 and 28 February 2015 by a team of researchers led by the University of Auckland.

"Despite a major reduction in overall infant mortality, in infancy (SUDI) continues to be of concern in New Zealand, as the rate is high by international standards, and is even higher in Māori," says lead researcher, Professor Edwin Mitchell, of the University of Auckland.

The research comes after a previous three-year case-control study in 1987-1990 which examined risk factors for sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), known as the New Zealand Cot Death Study.

"Our study shows that many of the risk factors that were identified in the original New Zealand Cot Death Study are still relevant today," says Professor Mitchell.

"The combination of in pregnancy and is extremely hazardous for infants.

"Furthermore, our findings indicate that the SUDI prevention messages are still applicable today and should be reinforced."

There were 137 SUDI cases during the three years, giving a SUDI mortality rate of 0.76 per 1000 live births. The rate for Māori was 1.41/1000, Pacific 1.01/1000 and non-Māori non-Pacific (predominantly European) 0.50/1000.

SUDI occurred more frequently in male infants than female, and were more common in twins and those with a low birth weight. The peak age of death was one to three months.

The research suggests that SUDI mortality could be reduced to seven per year in New Zealand (approximately 1 in 10,000 live births).

The two major for SUDI were found to be maternal smoking in pregnancy (6-fold increased risk) and bed sharing (5-fold increased risk).

The combination of maternal smoking in pregnancy and bed sharing is extremely hazardous for , with a 32-fold increased risk.

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BubbaNicholson
1 / 5 (2) Jun 06, 2017
Smoking may be more common in subordinate female emitters of poisonous axillary pheromone. SIDS, Sudden Infant Death Syndrome, is due to airborne pheromone poisoning and can be greatly diminished with oscillating fans.
SIDS susceptibility begins only with emissions of emotional tears by the infant at about 13 weeks if I'm not mistaken. Emotional tears contain a large soluble pheromone receptor protein fraction and odd biologically valuable ions used by those proteins in solution to change potential in the receptor tear film and potential difference (voltage) across receptor dendrites, which fires them electrically. This is why electrodes record simultaneously at dendritic tip and base in chemoreceptive neurons.
Captain Stumpy
5 / 5 (1) Jun 07, 2017
@fraudulent bubba the pseudoscience cult "oxymoronic" quack
SIDS, Sudden Infant Death Syndrome, is due to airborne pheromone poisoning
1- bullsh*t pseudoscience is not proving anything except that you're an idiot
http://rspb.royal...full.pdf

2- considering you've never once been able to produce empirical evidence demonstrating your point is scientific, then that means by definition that you're pushing a religious belief as you require someone to have faith in your argument

the only thing you have proven is that you're a fraud prescribing psychotropic medications illegally because you don't have a license, degree, education or even a basic knowledge of medicine and it's terminology

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