Research group focuses on economics of transportation needs for rural elderly

June 27, 2017 by Blair Fannin

A multidisciplinary team of researchers is examining economic issues associated with providing transportation for the rural elderly and other socially disadvantaged populations.

The aging baby boomer population is increasing the importance of mobility issues, including transportation, to society, the researchers said, also noting studies are needed to examine potential alternatives to increase the mobility of the elderly including both private and public alternatives.

"There are several reasons why the elderly proportion of the rural is increasing, including aging in place, people retiring to rural areas and outmigration of young people," said Dr. James Mjelde, research team leader and professor of agricultural economics at Texas A&M University in College Station. "As people are living longer, transportation for healthcare and other needs becomes even more paramount."

Rural residents are sometimes forced to make the difficult decision of staying in place or moving closer to healthcare and other services. The team hopes their research recommendations will help enhance rural transportation options to improve the quality of life for elderly and other disadvantaged individuals.

"Rural transportation providers are looking at innovative solutions," said Dr. Rebekka Dudensing, research team co-member and Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service economist in College Station. "It's clear that there is no single issue or solution that addresses the spectrum of rural transit districts."

Research recommendations include: improving the basic understanding of the needs of rural transit; how individual needs translate into broader community issues; how the adoption of innovative solutions and information technology might improve the coordination, management and efficiency of rural transit systems.

Specific recommendations are in the report titled, "Economics of Transportation Research Needs for Rural Elderly and Transportation Disadvantaged Populations" available at static.tti.tamu.edu/tti.tamu.e … ments/TTI-2017-1.pdf .

Explore further: CDC: prevalence of arthritis 31.8 percent in most rural areas of U.S.

Related Stories

CDC: prevalence of arthritis 31.8 percent in most rural areas of U.S.

May 31, 2017
(HealthDay)—The prevalence of arthritis is 31.8 percent in the most rural areas and 20.5 percent in the most urban areas of the United States, according to research published in the May 26 issue of the U.S. Centers for ...

America's rural elderly face barriers to health care

December 14, 2015
(HealthDay)—Elderly Americans who live in rural areas are at increased risk for health problems and death because of poor access to health care, a new study finds.

CDC: higher risk of death from leading causes in rural America

January 13, 2017
(HealthDay)—Americans who live in rural areas have a higher risk of death from five leading causes than people who live in urban locations, according to research published in the Jan. 13 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease ...

Graying of rural America has policy implications

July 4, 2013
More than 16.5 percent of rural Americans are age 65 or older, a higher proportion than in other parts of the country, so any changes to government services will have a greater affect on people who live in rural areas, reported ...

Improved access to health information needed in rural communities

February 17, 2017
Raised in a rural farming community, Brad Hiebert knows full well accessing health-care services and general health information can sometimes be a challenge.

Recommended for you

Exercise can make cells healthier, promoting longer life, study finds

September 22, 2017
Whether it's running, walking, cycling, swimming or rowing, it's been well-known since ancient times that doing some form of aerobic exercise is essential to good health and well-being. You can lose weight, sleep better, ...

Breathing dirty air may harm kidneys, study finds

September 21, 2017
Outdoor air pollution has long been linked to major health conditions such as heart disease, stroke, cancer, asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. A new study now adds kidney disease to the list, according to ...

Excess dietary manganese promotes staph heart infection

September 21, 2017
Too much dietary manganese—an essential trace mineral found in leafy green vegetables, fruits and nuts—promotes infection of the heart by the bacterium Staphylococcus aureus ("staph").

Being active saves lives whether a gym workout, walking to work or washing the floor

September 21, 2017
Physical activity of any kind can prevent heart disease and death, says a large international study involving more than 130,000 people from 17 countries published this week in The Lancet.

Frequent blood donations safe for some, but not all

September 21, 2017
(HealthDay)—Some people may safely donate blood as often as every eight weeks—but that may not be a healthy choice for all, a new study suggests.

Higher manganese levels in children correlate with lower IQ scores, study finds

September 21, 2017
A study led by environmental health researchers at the University of Cincinnati (UC) College of Medicine finds that children in East Liverpool, Ohio with higher levels of Manganese (Mn) had lower IQ scores. The research appears ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.