Vitamin B6 linked to increased risk of hip fracture

June 12, 2017

(HealthDay)—Vitamin B6, but not vitamin B12, is associated with increased risk of hip fracture during extended follow-up, according to a study published online June 2 in the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research.

Maria Garcia Lopez, M.D., from the University Hospital in Oslo, Norway, and colleagues conducted a secondary analysis of combined data from two large to examine the effect of an intervention with B-vitamins on the risk of . The intervention consisted of a daily capsule of plus vitamin B12 and vitamin B6, folic acid plus vitamin B12, folic acid plus vitamin B6, or placebo.

The researchers found that during the trial and extended follow-up there was no significant association between folic acid plus vitamin B12 treatment and the risk of hip fracture (hazard ratios, 0.87 [95 percent confidence interval, 0.48 to 1.59] and 1.08 [95 percent confidence interval, 0.84 to 1.40], respectively). There was also no significant between-group difference in the risk of hip fracture for those receiving versus not receiving vitamin B6 during the trial (hazard ratio, 1.42; 95 percent confidence interval, 0.78 to 2.61); however, the risk of hip fracture was higher for those receiving vitamin B6 during extended follow-up (hazard ratio, 1.42; 95 percent confidence interval, 1.09 to 1.83).

"These secondary analyses and extended follow-up of two large randomized controlled trials performed in Norway showed that treatment with folic acid plus vitamin B12 was not associated with the risk of hip fracture" the authors write. "However, treatment with high doses of vitamin B6 was associated with a slightly increased risk of experiencing a hip fracture during the extended follow-up (3.3 years in-trial plus 7.8 years post-trial follow-up)."

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