In vitro method for predicting the biocompatibility of medical implants

June 15, 2017

Researchers at the Universitat Jaume I (UJI), the University of the Basque Country (UPV-EHU) and the Centre for Cooperative Research in Biosciences (CIC bioGUNE) have patented a new in vitro method for predicting the biocompatibility of materials to be used in the manufacture of medical implants, such as joint and dental prostheses, valves and stents.

The patent is based on the detection of a group of proteins linked to the inflammatory reaction. In fact, researchers have identified a profile of protein markers, related to the immune response, that can be analysed in an isolated biological sample in vitro, and whose presence above a reference level is indicative of non-biocompatibility in vivo. "This methodology," explains the researcher Nuno Araújo, "will enable us to face the experiment in vivo with more security in the future, and to reduce the number of animals involved, while reducing time and costs."

The invention consists in an accelerated test of the biocompatibility of materials that makes it possible to discard those with poorer prospects of success during the in vitro phase, thus avoiding costly investments in unnecessary in vivo studies and facilitating a faster transfer of the to the clinical stage. It accelerates and significantly reduces the development of new implant materials and reduces the number of animals used for experimentation.

This methodology involves a robust correlation between the protein profile obtained in the in vitro tests and that acquired by means of in vivo trials, which are, by definition, more reliable. Thus, through the in vitro/in vivo correlation, determination and quantification of such markers in in vitro samples predicts the biocompatibility of biomaterials-implants, joint and dental prostheses or catheters, according to main researcher Julio Suay.

The technology is useful for the sectors of manufacturers of medical prostheses and for the producers of biomaterials, as well as for research groups of R & D centres that carry out in vitro and in vivo tests applied to the development of new materials. In the healthcare sector, it is particularly useful for patients who need an implant. In fact, with a simple blood test, detailed information could be obtained about whether the patient is likely to suffer complications in .

Explore further: Researchers increase the success rate of tooth implants

More information: Francisco Romero-Esparver et al. Proteome analysis of human serum proteins adsorbed onto different titanium surfaces used in dental implants, Biofouling (2016). DOI: 10.1080/08927014.2016.1259414

Related Stories

Researchers increase the success rate of tooth implants

April 29, 2013

Elderly or people with osteoporosis, smokers, diabetics or people who have had cancer are sometimes not eligible to receive dental implants as their bones are unable to correctly integrate the new prostheses which replace ...

Scientists increase the success rate of tooth implants

January 21, 2013

Elderly or people with osteoporosis, smokers, diabetics or people who have had cancer are sometimes not eligible to receive dental implants as their bones are unable to correctly integrate the new prostheses which replace ...

Recommended for you

A new weapon for the war on cancer

June 28, 2017

Cancerous tumors are formidable enemies, recruiting blood vessels to aid their voracious growth, damaging nearby tissues, and deploying numerous strategies to evade the body's defense systems. But even more malicious are ...

The gene behind follicular lymphoma

June 28, 2017

Follicular lymphoma is an incurable cancer that affects over 200,000 people worldwide every year. A form of non-Hodgkin lymphoma, follicular lymphoma develops when the body starts making abnormal B-cells, which are white ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.