Alzheimer's drug may help treat traumatic brain injury

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major cause of disability and death globally, but medications have generally failed to benefit patients. A new study found that memantine, a drug that is used to treat dementia associated with Alzheimer's disease, may be a promising therapy.

The study examined the effect of memantine on of neuron-specific enolase (NSE), a marker of neuronal damage, and the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) in patients with moderate TBI. The GCS is the most common scoring system used to describe the level of consciousness in a person following a TBI.

Patients with moderate TBI who received memantine had significantly reduced blood levels of NSE by day 7 and marked improvements in their GCS scores on day 3 of the study.


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More information: Majid Mokhtari et al. Effect of Memantine on Serum Levels of Neuron-Specific Enolase and on the Glasgow Coma Scale in Patients With Moderate Traumatic Brain Injury, The Journal of Clinical Pharmacology (2017). DOI: 10.1002/jcph.980
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Citation: Alzheimer's drug may help treat traumatic brain injury (2017, July 21) retrieved 6 June 2020 from https://medicalxpress.com/news/2017-07-alzheimer-drug-traumatic-brain-injury.html
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