CRC screen up for older patients, those not in labor force

July 28, 2017

(HealthDay)—Factors associated with colorectal cancer (CRC) screening rates at U.S. community health centers include age and insurance status, but not patient-provider communication, according to a study published online July 14 in Cancer.

Sue C. Lin, Ph.D., from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services in Rockville, Md., and colleagues used data from the 2014 Health Center Patient Survey to examine the correlation of sociodemographic variables and patient-provider communication with CRC screening receipt.

The researchers found that the odds of receiving CRC screening were higher for aged between 65 and 75 years (adjusted odds ratio, 2.49) and patients not in the labor force (adjusted odds ratio, 2.32). The odds of receiving CRC screening were lower for patients who were uninsured (adjusted odds ratio, 0.33) and for non-English-speaking patients (adjusted odds ratio, 0.42). There was no correlation for patient-provider communication with receipt of CRC screening.

"The CRC screening rate for health center patients was 57.9 percent, whereas the rate was 65.1 percent according to the 2012 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System and 58.2 percent according to the 2013 National Health Interview Survey," the authors write. "Addressing the lack of insurance, making culturally and linguistically appropriate patient education materials available, and training clinicians and care teams in cultural competency are critical for increasing future CRC screening rates."

Explore further: Tailored lay health educator program ups CRC screening

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

Tailored lay health educator program ups CRC screening

September 2, 2016
(HealthDay)—An intervention involving bilingual/bicultural lay health educator (LHE) education can increase colorectal cancer (CRC) screening among Hmong-Americans, according to a study published online Aug. 26 in Cancer.

Caregiver well-being linked to quality of cancer patient care

August 30, 2016
(HealthDay)—Informal caregiver well-being is associated with patient-perceived quality of care (QOC), according to a study published online Aug. 29 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Comprehensive discussion with docs ups cancer screening

April 29, 2013
(HealthDay)—Having more comprehensive discussions about colorectal cancer (CRC) screening with primary care providers (PCPs) is associated with increased odds of screening, according to a study published in the April issue ...

Participation in meaningful use doesn't up quality of care

January 4, 2017
(HealthDay)—Physician participation in meaningful use is associated with improvement in colorectal cancer screening, but is not associated with improvement in other quality measures, according to a study published online ...

Nonclinical factors drive antibiotic choice in pediatric CAP

March 10, 2017
(HealthDay)—For children with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), patient and nonclinical characteristics are associated with receipt of macrolides and broad-spectrum antibiotics versus amoxicillin, according to a study ...

No link for tea, coffee intake with barrett's esophagus

May 5, 2016
(HealthDay)—After adjustment for confounding variables there is no correlation between the risk of Barrett's esophagus (BE) and tea or coffee consumption, according to a study published in the May issue of Clinical Gastroenterology ...

Recommended for you

Researchers use a molecular Trojan horse to deliver chemotherapeutic drug to cancer cells

February 23, 2018
A research team at the University of California, Riverside has discovered a way for chemotherapy drug paclitaxel to target migrating, or circulating, cancer cells, which are responsible for the development of tumor metastases.

Study tracks evolutionary transition to destructive cancer

February 23, 2018
Evolution describes how all living forms cope with challenges in their environment, as they struggle to persevere against formidable odds. Mutation and selective pressure—cornerstones of Darwin's theory—are the means ...

Lab-grown 'mini tumours' could personalise cancer treatment

February 23, 2018
Testing cancer drugs on miniature replicas of a patient's tumour could help doctors tailor treatment, according to new research.

An under-the-radar immune cell shows potential in fight against cancer

February 23, 2018
One of the rarest of immune cells, unknown to scientists a decade ago, might prove to be a potent weapon in stopping cancer from spreading in the body, according to new research from the University of British Columbia.

Putting black skin cancer to sleep—for good

February 22, 2018
An international research team has succeeded in stopping the growth of malignant melanoma by reactivating a protective mechanism that prevents tumor cells from dividing. The team used chemical agents to block the enzymes ...

Cancer risk associated with key epigenetic changes occurring through normal aging process

February 22, 2018
Some scientists have hypothesized that tumor-promoting changes in cells during cancer development—particularly an epigenetic change involving DNA methylation—arise from rogue cells escaping a natural cell deterioration ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.