Noninvasive test may predict asthma attacks in children

July 19, 2017, Wiley
Children with asthma use inhalers to relieve some of their symptoms, which include coughing, wheezing, chest tightness and shortness of breath. Credit: Tradimus, Wikimedia commons.

A new technology may help to non-invasively analyse lung sounds in children and infants at risk of an asthma attack.

In a study of 70 severely asthmatic children, the approach was useful for predicting attack symptoms and for identifying asymptomatic children at high risk for an .

The results are published in Respirology.

Explore further: Asthmatic schoolchildren are 'uncomfortable' using their inhalers

More information: Respirology, DOI: 10.1111/resp.13109

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