How savvy are you about nail care safety?

July 28, 2017

(HealthDay)—Before your next manicure or pedicure, give some thought to the safety of your nail care products.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration says nail polishes and removers are safe when used as intended. But under the wrong circumstances, going for that polished look can ignite problems.

For example, some nail products can catch fire easily. They should not be exposed to flames, including lit cigarettes, or heat sources such as curling irons, the agency warns.

Also, some nail products should only be used in areas with good air circulation (ventilation). Some also can harm your eyes and can be harmful if swallowed.

The products must list ingredients in the order of decreasing amounts. If you have concerns about certain ingredients, check the labels.

Possible troublemakers include nail hardeners and nail polishes that contain formaldehyde, which can cause skin irritation or an allergic reaction. And acrylics, used in some artificial nails and sometimes in nail polishes, can cause , the FDA says.

If you have questions about whether certain nail products are right for you, talk to your , the agency advises.

Explore further: When is it nail fungus?

More information: The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has more on nail care products.

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