How savvy are you about nail care safety?

July 28, 2017

(HealthDay)—Before your next manicure or pedicure, give some thought to the safety of your nail care products.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration says nail polishes and removers are safe when used as intended. But under the wrong circumstances, going for that polished look can ignite problems.

For example, some nail products can catch fire easily. They should not be exposed to flames, including lit cigarettes, or heat sources such as curling irons, the agency warns.

Also, some nail products should only be used in areas with good air circulation (ventilation). Some also can harm your eyes and can be harmful if swallowed.

The products must list ingredients in the order of decreasing amounts. If you have concerns about certain ingredients, check the labels.

Possible troublemakers include nail hardeners and nail polishes that contain formaldehyde, which can cause skin irritation or an allergic reaction. And acrylics, used in some artificial nails and sometimes in nail polishes, can cause , the FDA says.

If you have questions about whether certain nail products are right for you, talk to your , the agency advises.

Explore further: When is it nail fungus?

More information: The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has more on nail care products.

Related Stories

When is it nail fungus?

July 27, 2017
(HealthDay)—If you think you have nail fungus, you might be tempted to hide your problem with nail polish or self-treat with over-the-counter antifungal products. But you should visit a doctor instead, a dermatologist suggests.

Health risks beneath the painted beauty in America's nail salons

May 20, 2015
The desire for beautiful nails has fueled an entire nail salon industry that's growing rapidly, with storefronts cropping up on every major street across the nation. Yet, the recent articles from the New York Times exposed ...

Avoid unsightly fungal toenail infections

March 21, 2017
(HealthDay)—Fungal nail infections, though unsightly, are generally painless and can often be prevented, a skin and nail specialist says.

Titanium exposure tied to yellow nail syndrome in pediatric patient

December 8, 2016
(HealthDay)—In a case report published online Dec. 7 in Pediatrics, yellow nail syndrome (YNS) is described in a 9-year-old girl who had titanium detected in her nail clippings.

Calif. finds toxins in 'nontoxic' nail polishes

April 10, 2012
(AP) -- Some nail polishes commonly found in California salons and advertised as free of a so-called "toxic trio" of chemicals actually have high levels of agents linked to birth defects, according to state chemical regulators.

Recommended for you

Juul e-cigarettes pose addiction risk for young users, study finds

October 19, 2018
Teens and young adults who use Juul brand e-cigarettes are failing to recognize the product's addictive potential, despite using it more often than their peers who smoke conventional cigarettes, according to a new study by ...

Engineered enzyme eliminates nicotine addiction in preclinical tests

October 17, 2018
Scientists at Scripps Research have successfully tested a potential new smoking-cessation treatment in rodents.

Nutrition has a greater impact on bone strength than exercise

October 17, 2018
One question that scientists and fitness experts alike would love to answer is whether exercise or nutrition has a bigger positive impact on bone strength.

Self-lubricating latex could boost condom use: study

October 17, 2018
A perpetually unctuous, self-lubricating latex developed by a team of scientists in Boston could boost the use of condoms, they reported Wednesday in the journal Royal Society Open Science.

How healthy will we be in 2040?

October 17, 2018
A new scientific study of forecasts and alternative scenarios for life expectancy and major causes of death in 2040 shows all countries are likely to experience at least a slight increase in lifespans. In contrast, one scenario ...

Adequate consumption of 'longevity' vitamins could prolong healthy aging, nutrition scientist says

October 16, 2018
A detailed new review of nutritional science argues that most American diets are deficient in a key class of vitamins and minerals that play previously unrecognized roles in promoting longevity and in staving off chronic ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.