Four ways to look younger longer

July 14, 2017 by Joan Mcclusky, Healthday Reporter

(HealthDay)—There's no escaping the fact that there'll be another birthday candle on your cake this year, but that doesn't mean your skin has to give away your age.

These four steps can help stop the —and you're never too young to start.

  • The main culprit behind aging is the sun's , including UVAs that penetrate your skin and damage collagen fibers. That sets off a that leads to wrinkles. The best way to prevent this damage, called photoaging, is by using at least SPF 15 sunscreen every day, even when you're just going to work or running errands. Many daywear cosmetics contain SPF, but if yours don't, apply sunscreen, wait 15 minutes, and then put on your makeup. But keep in mind that wearing sunscreen doesn't give you license to bake in the sun.
  • The skin around your eyes is particularly fragile, so be sure to wear sunglasses, too. Besides being stylish, they help prevent lines caused by squinting.
  • Another way to slow wrinkles is to not smoke. Researchers have studied sets of twins, in which one smoked and the other didn't. The ones who smoked had significantly more , bags around their eyes, and sagging jowls. And the longer they smoked, the older they looked compared to their non-smoking twin.
  • Step four is to avoid overdoing alcoholic drinks, which can lead to dehydration. That can make your skin more prone to developing fine lines and wrinkles.

Use all these tips to put your best face forward and defy the calendar.

Explore further: Study of twins shows how smoking ages the face

More information: To better understand the causes and effects of photoaging, check out the website of the Skin Cancer Foundation.

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