Four ways to look younger longer

July 14, 2017 by Joan Mcclusky, Healthday Reporter

(HealthDay)—There's no escaping the fact that there'll be another birthday candle on your cake this year, but that doesn't mean your skin has to give away your age.

These four steps can help stop the —and you're never too young to start.

  • The main culprit behind aging is the sun's , including UVAs that penetrate your skin and damage collagen fibers. That sets off a that leads to wrinkles. The best way to prevent this damage, called photoaging, is by using at least SPF 15 sunscreen every day, even when you're just going to work or running errands. Many daywear cosmetics contain SPF, but if yours don't, apply sunscreen, wait 15 minutes, and then put on your makeup. But keep in mind that wearing sunscreen doesn't give you license to bake in the sun.
  • The skin around your eyes is particularly fragile, so be sure to wear sunglasses, too. Besides being stylish, they help prevent lines caused by squinting.
  • Another way to slow wrinkles is to not smoke. Researchers have studied sets of twins, in which one smoked and the other didn't. The ones who smoked had significantly more , bags around their eyes, and sagging jowls. And the longer they smoked, the older they looked compared to their non-smoking twin.
  • Step four is to avoid overdoing alcoholic drinks, which can lead to dehydration. That can make your skin more prone to developing fine lines and wrinkles.

Use all these tips to put your best face forward and defy the calendar.

Explore further: Study of twins shows how smoking ages the face

More information: To better understand the causes and effects of photoaging, check out the website of the Skin Cancer Foundation.

Related Stories

Study of twins shows how smoking ages the face

October 30, 2013
(HealthDay)—A study comparing the faces of identical twins confirms what many smokers fear—the habit does prematurely age a person's skin, taking a serious toll on looks even after just five years.

Sunscreen 101

May 17, 2017
(HealthDay)—Many people make mistakes when using sunscreen that could increase their risk of skin cancer, a new study suggests.

Anti-aging strategies can improve more than looks

November 4, 2013
For many men and women older than 30, the fun of birthdays fades with aging, but experts at the University of Alabama at Birmingham offer advice on how to slow aging and boost self-esteem.

Sunscreen slows skin aging, if used often enough

June 3, 2013
New research from sunny Australia provides some of the strongest evidence to date that near-daily sunscreen use can slow the aging of skin.

Misapplication of sunscreen leaves people vulnerable to skin cancer

July 7, 2017
When applying sunscreen people miss on average 10 per cent of their face, the most common site for skin cancer, according to University of Liverpool research presented at the British Association of Dermatologists' Annual ...

There's no such thing as a safe, healthy tan

June 8, 2017
Dear Mayo Clinic: My daughter wanted to go to a tanning bed before prom, but, instead, she opted for a spray tan. But a lot of her friends are going to a tanning bed and think it's relatively safe. Is there such a thing as ...

Recommended for you

Brain disease seen in most football players in large report

July 25, 2017
Research on 202 former football players found evidence of a brain disease linked to repeated head blows in nearly all of them, from athletes in the National Football League, college and even high school.

Safety of medical devices not often evaluated by sex, age, or race

July 25, 2017
Researchers at Yale and the University of California-San Francisco have found that few medical devices are analyzed to consider the influence of their users' sex, age, or race on safety and effectiveness.

Why you should consider more than looks when choosing a fitness tracker

July 25, 2017
A UNSW study of five popular physical activity monitors, including Fitbit and Jawbone models, has found their accuracy differs with the speed of activity, and where they are worn.

Dog walking could be key to ensuring activity in later life

July 24, 2017
A new study has shown that regularly walking a dog boosts levels of physical activity in older people, especially during the winter.

Alcohol to claim 63,000 lives over next five years, experts warn

July 24, 2017
Alcohol consumption will cause 63,000 deaths in England over the next five years – the equivalent of 35 deaths a day – according to a new report from the University of Sheffield Alcohol Research Group.

Alcohol boosts recall of earlier learning

July 24, 2017
Drinking alcohol improves memory for information learned before the drinking episode began, new research suggests.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.