FDA approves pediatric treatment for Chagas disease

August 31, 2017

(HealthDay)—Benznidazole has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat the tropical parasitic infection Chagas disease, in children aged 2 to 12.

In clinical testing, 55 to 60 percent of 6 to 12 years old treated with benznidazole had a negative antibody test for Chagas, the FDA said.

The most common side effects of the medication included , rash, weight loss, headache, nausea, and vomiting. More serious risks could include serious skin reactions, nervous system effects, and bone marrow depression.

"The FDA is committed to making available safe and effective therapeutic options to treat tropical diseases," Edward Cox, M.D., director of the Office of Antimicrobial Products in the FDA's Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, said in a statement.

The drug is manufactured by Chemo Research S.L., based in Spain.

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