Researchers raise health concerns about off-road vehicles and inhalation of asbestos

August 30, 2017, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center

Preventing injuries may not be the only reason children shouldn't use off-road vehicles (ORVs).

In a new study, public health scientists raise concerns that people who use ORVs in many regions of the country may face exposure to hazardous mineral fibers. These include naturally occurring and erionite - an asbestos-like material that occurs in sedimentary rocks of the western United States.

Most of the deposits are located along the Appalachian Mountains and ranges in the West and Southwest, especially California.

"ORVs have been designed to operate in rugged, unpaved terrain, and they can produce copious amounts of dust," says Chris Wolfe, MS, an epidemiologist at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center and lead author of the study. "During off-roading in these areas, asbestos and other mineral fibers can become airborne as a component of the dust generated by ORVs. This puts riders - particularly children—at risk of inhalation exposure, but the dust can also be blown to other areas and may pose a risk to others. We found that a substantial amount of ORV trails are located within 20 miles of a naturally occurring asbestos deposit."

The study, which examines the potential for airborne fiber exposures associated with ORVs, reviews 15 previous studies on the subject and examines the spatial relationship between ORV trails and known deposits of these fibers.

The study is published online in the International Journal of Hygiene and Environmental Health.

Federal regulatory bodies have been concerned about the risks associated with ORV use in areas of naturally occurring asbestos and erionite. In 2008, for example, the Bureau of Land Management issued an emergency closure of a portion of the Clear Creek Recreation Area in California—home to the part of the New Idra Formation and containing the largest asbestos deposit in the nation. The US House of Representatives recently passed a bill to reopen the site for ORV use. The bill is currently awaiting approval in the Senate.

ORVs include four-wheel-drive vehicles, all-terrain vehicles, motorcycles and other vehicles designed for off-highway use. A report conducted between 2005 and 2007 estimated that 44 million Americans above the age of 15 had engaged in activities involving ORVs within the past year. The prevalence of ORV use among children and young adolescents is unknown.

It is also unknown how many of these ORV users have experienced negative health outcomes, but Wolfe and his colleagues call for studies to determine the prevalence of asbestos-related disease among those who frequently engage in ORV use where mineral fibers naturally occur.

In the meantime, Wolfe recommends avoiding these areas, especially when the environment is dry. If people do use ORVs, he recommends they take precautions, such as wearing a safety mask and goggles, although this will not eliminate the risk of exposure.

The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends legislation in all states prohibiting the use of 2- and 4-wheeled off-road vehicles by children younger than 16, as well as a ban on the sale of new and used 3-wheeled ATVs, with a recall of all used 3-wheeled ATVs.

Explore further: Fatal cancer found among Southern Nevada residents likely caused by asbestos in nature

Related Stories

Fatal cancer found among Southern Nevada residents likely caused by asbestos in nature

February 12, 2015
Southern Nevada counties that include Las Vegas show high proportions of women and younger residents coming down with a rare and aggressive cancer more commonly found in older men occupationally exposed to asbestos, suggesting ...

Mesothelioma in southern Nevada likely result of asbestos in environment

February 10, 2015
Malignant mesothelioma has been found at higher than expected levels in women and in individuals younger than 55 years old in the southern Nevada counties of Clark and Nye, likewise in the same region carcinogenic mineral ...

Canada to ban asbestos by 2018

December 15, 2016
Once the world's top producer of asbestos, Canada said Thursday it will ban the heat-resistant fibrous mineral that is woven into building and other materials but which has been found to cause cancer.

Recommended for you

The inequalities of prenatal stress

August 14, 2018
Exposure to an acute stress in utero can have long-term consequences extending into childhood – but only among children in poor households, according to a new Stanford study that looked at the long-term impact of acute, ...

Promoting HPV vaccine doesn't prompt risky sex by teens: study

August 13, 2018
(HealthDay)—Controversial state laws that promote vaccinating kids against the human papillomavirus (HPV) do not increase the likelihood that teens will engage in risky sexual behavior, a new study contends.

Grip strength of children gives clues about their future health

August 13, 2018
While other studies have shown that muscle weakness as measured by grip strength is a predictor of unhealthy outcomes—including cardiovascular and metabolic diseases, disability and even early mortality—this is the first ...

Prenatal vitamin D pills won't boost babies' growth: study

August 9, 2018
(HealthDay)—For pregnant women who are vitamin D-deficient, vitamin supplements won't improve the growth of their fetus or infant, Canadian researchers report.

Giving kids plates with segments and pictures caused them to eat more vegetables

August 8, 2018
A pair of researchers at the University of Colorado has found that preschool kids ate more vegetables when presented with segmented plates with pictures of fruits and vegetables on them. In their paper published in JAMA Pediatrics, ...

Is too much screen time harming children's vision?

August 6, 2018
As children spend more time tethered to screens, there is increasing concern about potential harm to their visual development. Ophthalmologists—physicians who specialize in medical and surgical eye care—are seeing a marked ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.