Does indoor spraying help prevent dengue?

August 31, 2017, Public Library of Science
The Mesocyclops is a predator that eats the dengue mosquito larvae. Credit: Department of Foreign Affairs, Flickr

The prevention of dengue, the most prevalent mosquito-borne virus in the world, relies heavily on controlling mosquito populations, as the currently available dengue vaccine is only partially effective. Indoor spraying—which involves spraying of insecticides inside houses—has the potential to be a key part of those prevention efforts, researchers report in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases.

Dengue infects between 300 and 500 million people every year, causing symptoms in around 100 million individuals and severe disease in half a million. The virus is primarily spread by Aedes aegypti mosquitos, which live in tropical and subtropical areas of the world. Numerous insecticides are known to kill adult and immature Aedes mosquitos, but exposing the mosquitos to the insecticides can be challenging, since the insects tend to rest in hidden, indoor areas.

To determine the effectiveness of indoor spraying in preventing , Olaf Horstick, of the University of Heidelberg, Germany, and colleagues searched seven research databases for existing literature on indoor residual spraying (IRS) and indoor space spraying (ISS). They then systematically reviewed papers that were identified pertaining to the effect of IRS and ISS on dengue.

Out of seven studies—three on IRS and four on ISS—all concluded that there was some effect on either mosquito populations or dengue case numbers. The strength of evidence was strongest for the effect of IRS and ISS on adult mosquito populations, with multiple studies reporting no adult mosquitos surviving the indoor treatments. Evidence on the indoor treatments to reduce larval populations or dengue cases was more limited. More research is needed on indoor spraying, the team concluded, although the review results are very promising, particularly in comparison with other Aedes control methods.

Explore further: Mutant mosquitos make insecticide-resistance monitoring key to controlling Zika

More information: Samuel M, Maoz D, Manrique P, Ward T, Runge-Ranzinger S, Toledo J, et al. (2017) Community effectiveness of indoor spraying as a dengue vector control method: A systematic review. PLoS Negl Trop Dis 11(8): e0005837. doi.org/10.1371/journal.pntd.0005837

Related Stories

Mutant mosquitos make insecticide-resistance monitoring key to controlling Zika

June 19, 2017
One of the most common insecticides used in the battle against the Aedes aegypti mosquito has no measurable impact when applied in communities where the mosquito has built up resistance to it, a study led by Emory University ...

Contact tracing, with indoor spraying, can curb dengue outbreak

February 17, 2017
Contact tracing, combined with targeted, indoor residual spraying of insecticide, can greatly reduce the spread of the mosquito-borne dengue virus, finds a study led by Emory University.

First Chikungunya-infected Aedes aegypti mosquitos found in Brazil

June 22, 2017
While more than 13,000 cases of Chikungunya viral disease were reported in Brazil in 2015, scientists had never before detected the virus in a captured mosquito in this country. Now, researchers reporting in PLOS Neglected ...

Aedes aegypti mosquitos introduced to California multiple times

August 10, 2017
Aedes aegypti mosquitos can carry the pathogens that cause dengue fever, chikungunya, Zika fever, and yellow fever, among other diseases. In 2013, scientists first reported that A. aegypti had been found in California. Now, ...

Mosquito monitoring has limited utility in dengue control, study finds

March 23, 2017
Cross-sectional surveys of mosquito abundance carried out in the subtropics and tropics are meant to give researchers an indication of the risk of a dengue virus outbreak in any given area. This type of entomological monitoring, ...

Millions of infected Brazilian mosquitoes to tackle dengue

August 30, 2017
Brazilian scientists on Tuesday began to unleash the first of millions of mosquitoes infected with a bacteria meant to prevent the insects from transmitting the dengue virus to humans.

Recommended for you

Study predicts 2018 flu vaccine will have 20 percent efficacy

April 19, 2018
A Rice University study predicts that this fall's flu vaccine—a new H3N2 formulation for the first time since 2015—will likely have the same reduced efficacy against the dominant circulating strain of influenza A as the ...

Zika presents hot spots in brains of chicken embryos

April 19, 2018
Zika prefers certain "hot spots" in the brains of chicken embryos, offering insight into how brain development is affected by the virus.

Low-cost anti-hookworm drug boosts female farmers' physical fitness

April 19, 2018
Impoverished female farm workers infected with intestinal parasites known as hookworms saw significant improvements in physical fitness when they were treated with a low-cost deworming drug. The benefits were seen even in ...

Super-superbug clones invade Gulf States

April 18, 2018
A new wave of highly antibiotic resistant superbugs has been found in the Middle East Gulf States, discovered by University of Queensland researchers.

Of mice and disease: Antibiotic-resistant bacteria discovered in NYC house mice

April 17, 2018
A study by scientists at the Center for Infection and Immunity (CII) at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health finds New York City house mice carry bacteria responsible for mild to life-threatening gastroenteritis ...

Discovery explains how the chickenpox and shingles virus remains dormant

April 16, 2018
A research team led by UCL and Erasmus University has found a missing piece to the puzzle of why the virus that causes chickenpox and shingles can remain dormant for decades in human cells.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.