Examining how psychiatric disorders progress

September 12, 2017, Loyola University Health System

Loyola Medicine psychiatrist Angelos Halaris, MD, is co-editor of a major new publication examining how psychiatric disorders progress over time, and how this progression can be stopped.

Neuroprogression in Psychiatric Disorders describes the progression of disorders such as schizophrenia, , and other mood and stress-related disorders.

Psychiatric and neurological disorders are chronic and progressive illnesses, characterized by recurrences, relapses and progressively increasing dysfunction. This process is called neuroprogression. In the book, internationally known experts critically review leading-edge advances in neuroprogression research, including factors such as the immune system that play key roles in neuroprogression.

Recent studies have shown that certain medications can potentially arrest neuroprogression, and advances in testing and imaging can lead to earlier diagnoses and treatments. The book is targeted to physicians and scientists involved in neuroprogression, including psychiatrists, neuroscientists, neurologists, immunologists, pharmacologists and molecular biologists.

Dr. Halaris is a professor in the department of psychiatry and behavioral neurosciences of Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine. Co-editor is Brian Leonard, PhD of the National University of Ireland.

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