Co-founder of 'Ice Bucket Challenge' dies after ALS battle

November 30, 2017

The ALS Association says a man credited as one of the co-founders of the viral "Ice Bucket Challenge" that swept social media in 2014 has died after a yearslong battle with the condition known as Lou Gerhig's disease. Anthony Senerchia was 46.

The Anthony Senerchia Jr. ALS Charitable Foundation website says the Pelham, New York, native died early Saturday.

In a video released by the ALS Association, Senerchia's wife, Jeanette, discusses how she helped launch the challenge by dumping a bucket of icy water on herself in 2014 and posting the video to Facebook. The challenge really took off when it reached friends of Pete Frates, a former baseball star at Boston College who was also fighting ALS.

Senerchia's bucket was put on display at the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History in Washington last year.

Explore further: Ice bucket that sparked charity blitz comes to Smithsonian

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