The heart risks of a desk job

November 10, 2017 by Julie Davis, Healthday Reporter

(HealthDay)—Your comfortable recliner and state-of-the-art office chair may be increasing your risk for heart disease. A sedentary lifestyle can raise cholesterol and threaten heart health.

If you have a desk job, it's especially important to counter long bouts of sitting with an hourly 5-minute exercise break, even if you stay within your office.

If you work long hours within the confines of a small cubicle, you'll need to be creative to find ways to get your blood flowing.

Here's how.

Shake up daily habits. Leave the perfect parking spot for someone else. Parking farther away from your building will give you a chance to stretch your legs before and after a long day at work.

Instead of sitting in the cafeteria during lunch, head outside to walk, talk and eat with your co-workers. You'll feel refreshed and ready to take on the second half of the day.

Rather than scheduling meetings in a stuffy conference room, take your group outside. The fresh air and camaraderie may even increase your creativity and productivity.

Here are more ways to get moving at a sedentary job:

  • Walk to talk to a co-worker instead of emailing.
  • Take a walk outside during coffee breaks.
  • Stand while talking on the phone.
  • Set an hourly reminder on your smartphone to walk in place.
  • Take the stairs instead of the elevator.

These tips don't just apply to the . Find ways to get more active at home, like doing one or two chores after dinner instead of sinking into the sofa right away.

And when you do watch TV, walk around during the commercials, and your will thank you.

Explore further: How to start a walking plan

More information: The University of Missouri has a list of popular activity and break reminder apps for your smartphone and your computer.

Related Stories

How to start a walking plan

October 3, 2017
(HealthDay)—Are you completely new to exercise? Getting fit doesn't have to be expensive or complicated. In fact, it can be as simple as putting one foot in front of the other.

How to incorporate fitness into your daily life

September 15, 2017
Working out is an important part of maintaining a healthy lifestyle, but sometimes it can be hard to find the time to fit it in. A Baylor College of Medicine expert gives his tips on how to incorporate fitness into your daily ...

Can't get to the gym? Work out in your office

July 24, 2017
(HealthDay)—Making time for exercise during your workday can be difficult.

More TV & less physical activity ramps up risk of walking disability

August 30, 2017
Older people who watched more than five hours of TV per day and reported three or fewer hours per week of total physical activity had more than a three-fold higher risk of being unable to walk or having difficulty walking ...

Taking the stairs a better pick-me-up than coffee

April 28, 2017
(HealthDay)—You'll feel more energized if you do some easy stair walking rather than drinking caffeine, a new study recommends.

Walking vs. running—which is better?

May 4, 2017
(HealthDay)—Running and walking are both popular ways to get a great cardio workout. But is a brisk walk really as good an exercise as a sweaty, heart-pounding run?

Recommended for you

Sweet, bitter, fat: New study reveals impact of genetics on how kids snack

February 22, 2018
Whether your child asks for crackers, cookies or veggies to snack on could be linked to genetics, according to new findings from the Guelph Family Health Study at the University of Guelph.

The good and bad health news about your exercise posts on social media

February 22, 2018
We all have that Facebook friend—or 10—who regularly posts photos of his or her fitness pursuits: on the elliptical at the gym, hiking through the wilderness, crossing a 10K finish line.

Smartphones are bad for some teens, not all

February 21, 2018
Is the next generation better or worse off because of smartphones? The answer is complex and research shows it largely depends on their lives offline.

Tackling health problems in the young is crucial for their children's future

February 21, 2018
A child's growth and development is affected by the health and lifestyles of their parents before pregnancy - even going back to adolescence - according to a new study by researchers at the Murdoch Children's Research Institute, ...

Lead and other toxic metals found in e-cigarette 'vapors': study

February 21, 2018
Significant amounts of toxic metals, including lead, leak from some e-cigarette heating coils and are present in the aerosols inhaled by users, according to a study from scientists at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public ...

Why teens need up to 10 hours' sleep

February 21, 2018
Technology, other distractions and staying up late make is difficult, but researchers say teenagers need to make time for 8-10 hours of sleep a night to optimise their performance and maintain good health and wellbeing.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.