Baby milk maker orders global recall over salmonella fears

December 11, 2017
Baby milk maker orders global recall over salmonella fears
This Monday, Aug. 22, 2016 file photo shows a general view of the Lactalis headquarters in Laval, western France. Baby milk maker Lactalis and French authorities have ordered a global recall of millions of products over fears of salmonella bacteria contamination. Company spokesman Michel Nalet told The Associated Press on Monday Dec. 11, 2017, that the "precautionary" recall both in France and abroad affects "several million" products made since mid-February. (AP Photo/David Vincent, File)

Baby milk maker Lactalis and French authorities have ordered a global recall of millions of products over fears of salmonella bacteria contamination.

The French , one of the largest dairy groups in the world, said it has been warned by in France that 26 infants have become sick since Dec. 1.

According to a list published on the French health ministry's website, the recall affects customers in countries around the world, including: Britain and Greece in Europe, Morocco and Sudan in Africa, Peru and Colombia in South America and Pakistan, Bangladesh and China in Asia. The United States, a major market for Lactalis, is not affected.

Company spokesman Michel Nalet told The Associated Press on Monday that the "precautionary" recall affects "several million" products made since mid-February.

Lactalis said in a statement that the 26 cases of were linked to products branded Picot SL, Pepti Junior 1, Milumel Bio 1 and Picot Riz.

It said it is "sincerely sorry for the concern generated by the situation and expresses its compassion and support to the families whose children fell ill."

The symptoms of include abdominal cramps, diarrhea and fever. Most people recover without treatment.

The company said a possible source of the outbreak has been identified in a tower used to dry out the milk at a production site in May. Disinfection and cleaning measures have been put in place at the suspected site in western France.

The health scare started earlier this month when Lactalis was told that 20 infants under six months of age had been diagnosed with salmonella infection. The company ordered a first recall that has been extended to more products at the request of French authorities following new cases of infections.

Lactalis is a privately held company headquartered in Laval, western France. It has 75,000 employees in 85 countries and annual revenues of about 17 billion euros ($20 billion). Its other notable brands include President and Galbani cheeses and Parmalat milk.

Explore further: Major recall of Lactalis baby milk over salmonella fears (Update)

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