Couples win lawsuit over donated eggs with genetic defect

December 14, 2017

Two couples that gave birth to children with a genetic defect later traced to donated eggs have won a lawsuit against a New York fertility doctor and his clinic.

The two children have Fragile X, which causes intellectual impairments. The were supposed to be screened for genetic conditions.

The case hinged on the state's medical malpractice statute of limitations, which bars lawsuits filed more than two and a half years after the alleged malpractice.

The lawsuits were filed two years after the children were born, when the condition became apparent, but more than two and a half years following final fertility treatments.

Attorneys for the Reproductive Medicine Associates clinic and physician Alan Copperman argued the lawsuits were filed too late. They did not immediately respond to a comment request Thursday.

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