Precision medicine test may help detect coronary artery disease

December 6, 2017

In a Journal of the American Geriatrics Society study, a blood-based precision medicine test incorporating age, sex, and gene expression score (ASGES) was helpful in evaluating older outpatients with symptoms suggestive of obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD).

In the study of 176 stable, non-acute outpatients presenting with symptoms suggestive of obstructive CAD who were aged 65 and older, participants with low scores with low likelihood of obstructive CAD were referred for further evaluation at low rates, whereas those with higher scores had higher rates of referral to cardiology and advanced cardiovascular tests.

At 1-year follow-up, the incidence of major or revascularization was higher in participants with high ASGES than in those with low ASGES (10 percent versus 0 percent).

Explore further: Coronary CT angiography ups prediction of MACE in T2DM

More information: Joseph A. Ladapo et al, Utility of a Precision Medicine Test in Elderly Adults with Symptoms Suggestive of Coronary Artery Disease, Journal of the American Geriatrics Society (2017). DOI: 10.1111/jgs.15215

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