An eNose that sniffs out bacteria that cause soft tissue infections

January 17, 2018, University of Tampere

A recent study conducted at the University of Tampere, Tampere University of Technology, Pirkanmaa Hospital District and Fimlab in Finland has concluded that an electronic nose (eNose) can be used to identify the most common bacteria causing soft tissue infections. The eNose can be used to detect the bacteria without the prior preparation of samples, and the system was capable of differentiating methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) from methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA).

Skin and are common diseases that need medical treatment. Their diagnosis is usually based on bacterial cultures, but in uncomplicated cases the diagnosis may be made directly based on the clinical presentation of the disease. However, this may lead to empirical antibiotic treatments, i.e. treatments without a specific diagnosis, which may result in longer treatment times, adverse effects and increased costs.

"Our aim was to create a method for the rapid diagnosis of soft tissue infections. If we had such a method, could be started in a timely manner and targeted to the relevant pathogen directly. This would reduce the need for empirical treatments and shorten diagnostic delays," says doctoral researcher Taavi Saviauk from the Faculty of Medicine and Life Sciences at the University of Tampere.

"The portable eNose device we used does not require laboratory conditions or special training, so it is well suited for outpatient use. The results of this study are a significant step towards our goal," Saviauk continues.

An electronic nose is a device that produces "an olfactory profile" for each molecular compound in the air. The results are analysed by a computer and the system is programmed to differentiate between different compounds.

The research group conducting the study has previously shown how an eNose can be successfully used to differentiate prostate cancer from using a urine sample and distinguish between the various bacteria that cause .

Explore further: Researcher exposes MRSA risk at northeast Ohio beaches

More information: Taavi Saviauk et al, Electronic Nose in the Detection of Wound Infection Bacteria from Bacterial Cultures: A Proof-of-Principle Study, European Surgical Research (2018). DOI: 10.1159/000485461

Related Stories

Researcher exposes MRSA risk at northeast Ohio beaches

December 14, 2017
Beachgoers know there is always some risk of disease, but a recent study by a Kent State University researcher shows they may not be aware of all the dangers the beach poses.

Electronic nose sniffs out prostate cancer using urine samples

May 1, 2014
We may soon be able to make easy and early diagnoses of prostate cancer by smell. Investigators in Finland have established that a novel noninvasive technique can detect prostate cancer using an electronic nose. In a proof ...

Technology leads to better treatment for Staphylococcus aureus sepsis

June 5, 2017
A new testing and treatment approach led to shorter hospital stays for patients with Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infections. Study results were presented at the ASM Microbe 2017 conference in New Orleans, LA, on June ...

Increasing susceptibility of Staphylococcus aureus in the US

June 5, 2017
Findings from a study that looked at susceptibility trends of Staphylococcus aureus in U.S. hospital patients showed that key antibiotics used to treat the bacteria became more active over the course of the study, a rare ...

Recommended for you

Polio: Environmental monitoring will be key as world reaches global eradication

October 15, 2018
Robust environmental monitoring should be used as the world approaches global eradication of polio, say University of Michigan researchers who recently studied the epidemiology of the 2013 silent polio outbreak in Rahat, ...

Study traces hospital-acquired bloodstream infections to patients' own bodies

October 15, 2018
The most common source of a bloodstream infection acquired during a hospital stay is not a nurse's or doctor's dirty hands, or another patient's sneeze or visitor's cough, but the patient's own gut, Stanford University School ...

Researchers make essential imaging tests safer for people at risk of acute kidney injury

October 15, 2018
Every year, millions of people undergo medical tests and procedures, such as coronary angiography, which use intravascular contrast dyes. "For the majority of patients, these are safe and necessary procedures. However, about ...

Medical marijuana might help MS patients, but uncertainty remains

October 13, 2018
Medical products derived from marijuana might have a mild benefit in treating symptoms of multiple sclerosis, based on reports from patients.

Do not give decongestants to young children for common cold symptoms, say experts

October 11, 2018
Decongestants should not be given to children under 6—and given with caution in children under 12—as there is no evidence that they alleviate symptoms such as a blocked or runny nose, and their safety is unclear, say ...

New techniques can detect Lyme disease weeks before current tests

October 11, 2018
Researchers have developed techniques to detect Lyme disease bacteria weeks sooner than current tests, allowing patients to start treatment earlier.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.