Study provides insights on links between childhood abuse and later depression

January 10, 2018, Wiley
Credit: CC0 Public Domain

Results from an International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry study suggest that smaller social networks and feelings of loneliness might be important risk factors for late-life depression in older adults with a history of childhood abuse as well as with an earlier onset of depression.

The findings highlight the importance of detecting the presence of in adults with depression and possibly to integrate this into treatment.

"Apart from the presence of childhood abuse, also the age at depression onset is important to consider in and might give some clues as to which factors are important in treatment," said Ilse Wielaard, of the VU University Medical Centre, in Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

Explore further: Study links self-reported childhood abuse to death in women years later

More information: International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, DOI: 10.1002/gps.4828

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