Prompt clot-grabbing treatment produces better stroke outcomes

January 25, 2018, American Heart Association

Clot removal may be beneficial up to 24 hours following stroke in carefully selected patients, but every hour delayed after symptoms begin may be associated with more disability, according to preliminary research presented at the American Stroke Association's International Stroke Conference 2018, a world premier meeting dedicated to the science and treatment of cerebrovascular disease for researchers and clinicians.

The international DAWN trial previously demonstrated that patients with a small area of irreversible brain damage and a large area of brain at jeopardy of being lost if the remains are more likely to recover with minimal disability if the clot is removed up to 24 hours after symptoms begin or were noticed. It is already well-established that the benefit of clot removal declines each hour during the first 6 hours after symptoms are detected.

In the current analysis of treatment between 6 and 24 hours after symptoms were observed, or after the person was last seen to be well, researchers found:

  • each 1-hour delay reduces the chance of recovery with minimal or no disability by 11 percent; and
  • treatment remains beneficial through 24 hours, with patients who had their clots removed being 35.5 percent more likely to have minimal or no disability 90 days later, but the overall effect of treatment declines with time.

The current results demonstrate the importance of prompt imaging and treatment of patients with clot-caused , even in those who wake up having experienced a stroke or who for other reasons are not identified in the first few hours after the onset of symptoms.

Explore further: Quicker clot removal may lead to better outcomes

Related Stories

Quicker clot removal may lead to better outcomes

February 17, 2016
The faster a blood clot causing a stroke is removed, the less disability a patient may have, according to research presented at the American Stroke Association's International Stroke Conference 2016.

More stroke patients may receive crucial treatments under new guideline

January 24, 2018
More patients could be eligible for critical treatments to remove or dissolve blood clots that cause strokes, according to a new treatment guideline issued by the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

Brain-scan guided emergency stroke treatment can save more lives

January 24, 2018
Advances in brain imaging can identify a greater number of stroke patients who can receive therapy later than previously believed, according to a new study. The results of the Endovascular Therapy Following Imaging Evaluation ...

Landmark study may impact standard stroke treatment guidelines

November 11, 2017
Standard guidelines for stroke treatment currently recommend clot removal only within six hours of stroke onset. But a milestone study with results published today in the New England Journal of Medicine shows that clot removal ...

Imaging, not time, may determine who is right for stroke clot removal

February 17, 2016
Brain imaging may accurately identify patients likely to benefit from stroke clot removal instead of relying on the time since symptoms began as an indicator of treatment eligibility, according to research presented at the ...

Study: Removing clot helps limit stroke disability

December 17, 2014
For the first time in several decades, a new treatment has been shown to limit the damage from a common type of stroke. Researchers in the Netherlands found that mechanically removing a clot in addition to using a clot-busting ...

Recommended for you

Predicting leaky heart valves with 3-D printing

December 10, 2018
More than one in eight people aged 75 and older in the United States develop moderate-to-severe blockage of the aortic valve in their hearts, usually caused by calcified deposits that build up on the valve's leaflets and ...

Study points to optimal blood pressure treatment for stroke patients

December 10, 2018
Aggressive treatment of hypertension in stroke patients could do more harm than good in the long term, according to a new study from researchers at the University of Georgia.

Team uses gene editing to personalize clinical care for family with cardiomyopathy

December 10, 2018
A little over a year ago, a 65-year-old woman with severe hypertrophic cardiomyopathy—a condition in which the heart's muscle becomes abnormally thick, potentially causing dangerous irregular heartbeats—had her genes ...

Researchers explore what's behind Mediterranean diet and lower cardiovascular risk

December 7, 2018
A new study by investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health offers insights from a cohort study of women in the U.S. who reported consuming a Mediterranean-type ...

Increasing statins dose and patient adherence could save more lives

December 7, 2018
Thousands of heart attacks and deaths from cardiovascular disease could be prevented by patients taking higher doses of statins and taking the drugs as advised by doctors.

Progress made in transplanting pig hearts into baboons

December 6, 2018
A large team of researchers from several institutions in Germany, Sweden, Switzerland and the U.S. has transplanted pig hearts into baboons and kept them alive for an extended period of time. In their paper published in the ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.