Study examines urinary tract infections and antibiotic use in nursing homes

January 10, 2018, Wiley

In a Journal of the American Geriatrics Society study of nursing homes in the tropics, one in five residents had received antibiotics within the last 30 days. Also, urinary tract infection (UTI) accounted for 40 percent of all infections treated with antibiotics within the last 30 days.

New or worsening confusion was one of the strongest factors associated with for suspected UTI.

"In the era of growing antimicrobial resistance, it is vital to ensure that antibiotics are only used when clearly indicated," said lead author Dr. Sean Mayne, of James Cook University, in Cairns, Australia.

"Suspected UTI is the most common reason for antibiotic prescription in nursing home residents, often a presumptive diagnosis based on non-specific symptoms, which makes it a key target for reducing inappropriate antibiotic prescriptions."

Explore further: Constitutional symptoms often trigger antibiotic Rx in elderly

More information: Journal of the American Geriatrics Society (2018). DOI: 10.1111/jgs.15179

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