PTs support interprofessional model of care with pharmacists

March 14, 2018

(HealthDay)—The majority of Canadian physical therapists positively view a new interprofessional model of care with pharmacists, according to a study published online March 6 in the Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice.

Eveline Matifat, from the University of Montreal, and colleagues surveyed 225 Canadian physical therapists to assess their interest in using a new interprofessional model of care and explored their opinions concerning their ability to recommend to patients in with neuromusculoskeletal disorders.

The researchers found that 70 percent of respondents knew about the model of care, but only 15 percent had used it in the past. One major reason reported for the lack of use was a perceived increase in workload (51 percent). Most respondents reported a positive perception of this model and interactions with pharmacists, and were also confident in their ability to safely recommend medication (63 percent). However, nearly two-thirds (63 percent) believed further training was needed to enable physical therapists to provide efficient and safe nonprescription medication recommendations to patients with neuromusculoskeletal disorders.

"Overall, have a positive perception of this model, but there remain opportunities for increased integration into practice," conclude the authors.

Explore further: Docs' preparedness influences exercise recommendations

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