Colon cancer survival varies by insurance type

April 20, 2018

(HealthDay)—Compared to patients with private insurance, colon cancer survival is lower for patients with no insurance or with Medicaid, according to a study published in the May issue of Diseases of the Colon & Rectum.

Dianne Pulte, M.D., from the German Cancer Research Center in Heidelberg, and colleagues examined survival for with colon cancer by insurance type (Medicaid, uninsured, or other insurance) using a sample derived from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results 18 database.

The researchers found that of the 55,432 patients, 13.7 percent had Medicaid, 7.5 percent no insurance, and 78.8 percent other insurance. Compared to patients with other insurance, those with Medicaid or without insurance were more likely to have metastatic disease. Survival was lowest for patients with Medicaid, with three-year survival estimates of 57.0 percent for Medicaid, 61.2 percent for uninsured, and 75.6 percent for other insurance. Even after adjustment for stage, especially for later-stage disease, significant disparities persisted, but the discrepancy decreased when only patients with stage I to II disease who had definitive surgery and resection of ≥12 lymph nodes were included in the analysis.

"Colon cancer survival is lower for patients with no insurance or with Medicaid than for those with ," the authors write. "Differences in rates of definitive surgery and adequate explain some of this disparity."

Explore further: Does health insurance status affect childhood cancer survival?

More information: Abstract/Full Text

Related Stories

Does health insurance status affect childhood cancer survival?

September 11, 2017
A new study examines whether insurance status may affect survival in children diagnosed with cancer. Published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the findings suggest largely similar ...

Study links health insurance status and head and neck cancer diagnoses, outcomes

February 18, 2016
Compared to patients with non-Medicaid insurance, uninsured patients and patients with Medicaid are more likely to present with advanced stages of head and neck cancer and have higher overall and cancer-specific mortality ...

Affordable Care Act lowered uninsured rate for cancer survivors

February 15, 2018
The percentage of cancer survivors without health insurance decreased substantially after implementation of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), reports a study in the March issue of Medical Care.

ACA Medicaid expansion cut disparities in cancer care for minorities, poor

September 26, 2017
States that fully expanded their Medicaid programs under the Affordable Care Act cut their rates of uninsured cancer patients by more than half between 2011 and 2014. Black patients and those living in the highest poverty ...

Differences in cancer survival by type of insurance

December 4, 2017
(HealthDay)—From 1997 to 2014, improvements in cancer survival were mainly limited to patients with private or Medicare insurance, according to a study published online Nov. 30 in JAMA Oncology.

Studies link cancer patient's survival time to insurance status

September 23, 2016
Privately insured people with two types of cancer were diagnosed earlier and lived longer than those who were uninsured or were covered by Medicaid, according to two new studies.

Recommended for you

In zebrafish, a way to find new cancer therapies, targeting tumor modulators

September 21, 2018
The lab of Leonard Zon, MD, at Boston Children's Hospital has long been interested in making blood stem cells in quantity for therapeutic purposes. Looking for a way to test for their presence in zebrafish, their go-to research ...

What can salad dressing tell us about cancer? Think oil and vinegar

September 20, 2018
Researchers led by St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists have identified another way the process that causes oil to form droplets in water may contribute to solid tumors, such as prostate and breast cancer. The ...

Novel biomarker found in ovarian cancer patients can predict response to therapy

September 20, 2018
Despite months of aggressive treatment involving surgery and chemotherapy, about 85 percent of women with high-grade wide-spread ovarian cancer will have a recurrence of their disease. This leads to further treatment, but ...

Testing fluorescent tracers used to help surgeons determine edges of breast cancer tumors

September 20, 2018
A team of researchers with members from institutions in The Netherlands and China has conducted a test of fluorescent tracers meant to aid surgeons performing tumor removal in breast cancer patients. In their paper published ...

Cancer immunotherapy might benefit from previously overlooked immune players

September 20, 2018
Cancer immunotherapy—efforts to boost a patient's own immune system, allowing it to better fight cancer cells on its own—has shown great promise for some previously intractable cancers. Yet immunotherapy doesn't work ...

New way to target advanced breast cancers

September 20, 2018
A cytokine signature found in certain kinds of breast cancer cells can not only serve as a diagnostic tool for HER2-negative cancers but also offer an effective treatment target.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.