FDA names drugmakers accused of blocking cheaper generics

May 17, 2018 by Linda A. Johnson
FDA names drugmakers accused of blocking cheaper generics
In this Oct. 14, 2015, the Food & Drug Administration (FDA) campus in Silver Spring, Md. U.S. drug regulators are publicizing information on brand-name drugmakers that use what government officials call "gaming tactics" to block cheaper copycat versions. The Food and Drug Administration's new webpage names the makers of more than 50 brand-name drugs, some carrying six-figure annual price tags. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, File)

U.S. drug regulators are publicizing information on brand-name drugmakers that use what government officials call "gaming tactics" to block cheaper copycat versions.

The Food and Drug Administration's new webpage names the makers of more than 50 brand-name drugs, some carrying six-figure annual price tags, who are under scrutiny. The agency also lists how many inquiries it has received from who say they are having trouble getting access to the brand-name drugs.

Generic drug companies generally require 1,000 to 1,500 units, such as pills, of a brand-name drug to create much-cheaper drugs with identical active ingredients and effects. The FDA says brand-name drugmakers sometimes refuse to sell generic companies drugs that may need extra safety monitoring or bar wholesalers from selling other medicines to generic drugmakers.

Explore further: FDA takes steps to boost generic competition, limit prices

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