Medicaid expansion ups access to rehab in young adults with injury

June 9, 2018

(HealthDay)—For young adults hospitalized for injury, the first year of implementation of Medicaid expansion under the Affordable Care Act correlated with significant increases in Medicaid coverage, reductions in lack of insurance, and increases in discharge to rehabilitation, according to a study published online June 6 in JAMA Surgery.

Manzilat Akande, M.D., M.P.H., from Nationwide Children's Hospital in Columbus, Ohio, and colleagues examined changes in insurance coverage and risk adjusted outcomes among adults aged 19 to 44 years who were hospitalized for injuries before and after Medicaid expansion (2012 to 2013 versus 2014) using the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project State Inpatient Databases. Data were included for 141,187 trauma patients hospitalized across 11 Medicaid expansion states.

The researchers found that Medicaid expansion correlated with an increase in Medicaid coverage (from 16.7 to 34.9 percent), a reduction in lack of insurance (from 27.8 to 12.7 percent), and an increase in discharge to rehabilitation (from 11.4 to 12.6 percent) (all P < 0.001). No significant decreases were seen in in-hospital mortality, failure to rescue, or unplanned readmissions.

"We found significant gains in Medicaid coverage, reductions in uninsured rates, and improved access to rehabilitation during the first year of Medicaid expansion," the authors write. "As data become available, further research into the effects of Medicaid expansion on trauma care and outcomes in more recent years is warranted."

Explore further: Medicaid expansion produces significant health benefits, study finds

More information: Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

Medicaid expansion produces significant health benefits, study finds

June 5, 2018
The first peer-reviewed comprehensive analysis of the effects of Medicaid expansion paints a picture of significant improvements in various health outcomes consistent with the original goals of the Affordable Care Act, also ...

Medicaid expansion cuts out-of-pocket spending

February 2, 2018
(HealthDay)—States that expanded Medicaid cut the probability of non-elderly near-poor adults being uninsured and lowered average out-of-pocket spending, according to a study published online Jan. 24 in Health Affairs.

Medicaid expansion increased Medicaid enrollment among liver transplant recipients

July 26, 2016
Researchers have found that Medicaid expansion increased Medicaid enrollment among people who received liver transplants funded by commercial insurance. The findings are published inLiver Transplantation.

Affordable Care Act expands health coverage to more patients, although differences remain

September 12, 2017
Expansion of Medicaid coverage under the Affordable Care Act has contributed to sizeable decreases in medical visits in which people were uninsured. This is true across all racial and ethnic groups, although disparities remain.

Affordable Care Act lowered uninsured rate for cancer survivors

February 15, 2018
The percentage of cancer survivors without health insurance decreased substantially after implementation of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), reports a study in the March issue of Medical Care.

Medicaid expansion states saw ER visits go up, uninsured ER visits go down

June 19, 2017
States that expanded Medicaid coverage under the Affordable Care Act (the ACA) saw 2.5 emergency department visits more per 1,000 people after 2014, while the share of emergency department visits by the uninsured decreased ...

Recommended for you

Amount of weight regain after bariatric surgery helps predict health risks

October 16, 2018
Measuring the percentage of weight regained following the maximum amount of weight lost after bariatric surgery can help predict a patient's risk of several serious health problems, according to a long-term, multicenter study ...

Technique to 'listen' to a patient's brain during tumour surgery

October 16, 2018
Surgeons could soon eavesdrop on a patient's brain activity during surgery to remove their brain tumour, helping improve the accuracy of the operation and reduce the risk of impairing brain function.

Researchers link gut bacteria to heart transplant success or failure

October 4, 2018
In a new study, researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) have found that the gut microbiome appears to play a key role in how well the body accepts a transplanted heart. The scientists found a ...

Focus on neuroscience, nociception to improve anesthesia, paper says

October 1, 2018
People sometimes mistakenly think of general anesthesia as just a really deep sleep but in fact, anesthesia is really four brain states—unconsciousness, amnesia, immobility and suppression of the body's damage sensing response, ...

Bariatric surgery linked to safer childbirth for the mother

September 27, 2018
Obese mothers who lose weight through bariatric surgery can have safer deliveries. The positive effects are many, including fewer caesarean sections, infections, tears and haemorrhages, and fewer cases of post-term delivery ...

Antibiotics for appendicitis? Surgery often not needed

September 25, 2018
When emergency tests showed the telltale right-sided pain in Heather VanDusen's abdomen was appendicitis, she figured she'd be quickly wheeled into surgery. But doctors offered her the option of antibiotics instead.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.