Japan human trial tests iPS cell treatment for Parkinson's

July 30, 2018
Japan's Riken research institute in Kyoto is a world leader in groundbreaking iPS cells

Japanese researchers on Monday announced the first human trial using a kind of stem cell to treat Parkinson's disease, building on earlier animal trials.

The research team at Kyoto University plans to inject five million induced Pluripotent Stem (iPS) cells—which have the potential to develop into any cell in the body—into patient brains, the university said in a press release.

The iPS cells from healthy donors will be developed into dopamine-producing brain cells, which are no longer present in people with Parkinson's disease.

Parkinson's disease is a chronic, that affects the body's motor system, often causing shaking and other difficulties in movement.

Worldwide, about 10 million people have the illness, according to the Parkinson's Disease Foundation.

Currently available therapies "improve symptoms without slowing or halting the disease progression," the foundation says.

But the new research aims to actively reverse the disease.

The clinical test with seven participants aged between 50 and 69 will begin on Wednesday.

The university will monitor the conditions of the patients for two years after the operation.

The human trial comes after an earlier trial involving monkeys.

Researchers announced last year that primates with Parkinson's symptoms regained significant mobility after iPS cells were inserted into their brains.

They also confirmed that the iPS cells had not transformed into tumors during the two years after the implant.

iPS cells are created by stimulating mature, already specialised, cells back into a juvenile state—basically cloning without the need for an embryo.

These can be derived from the patient, making them less likely to be rejected, while also sidestepping ethical qualms about taking cells from embryos.

The cells can be transformed into a range of different types of cells, and their use is a key sector of medical research.

In 2014, Riken, a Japanese government-backed research institution, carried out the world's first surgery to implant iPS cells to treat a patient with (AMD), a common medical condition that can lead to blindness in older people.

Osaka University is also planning a clinical test to treat heart failure by using a heart muscle cell sheet created from iPS cells.

In the US, scientists from Duke University said in January they had managed for the first time to grow functioning human muscle from iPS cells in the lab.

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Anonym578175
not rated yet Aug 13, 2018
The love of my life for the last 17 years was diagnosed with Parkinson's disease nearly 4 years ago, at age 52. He had a stooped posture, tremors, muscle stiffness, horrible driving skills, and slow movement. He was placed on Sinemet 50/200 at night for 7 months and then Sifrol and rotigotine were introduced which replaced the Sinemet but he had to stop due to side effects. He started having hallucinations, lost touch with reality. Suspecting it was the medications I took him off the Siferol (with the doctor's knowledge) In March this year his primary physician suggested we started him on Natural Herbal Gardens Parkinson's Herbal formula which eased his anxiety a bit, i'm happy to report this PD herbal treatment worked very effectively. His Parkinson's is totally under control, he had a total decline in symptoms, the tremors, shaking, stiffness, slow movement and speech problems stopped. Visit Natural Herbal Gardens official web page ww w. naturalherbalgardens. c om
Anonym807763
not rated yet 19 hours ago
At 60 i was diagnose of PARKINSONS DISEASE, i was on Carbidopa and Pramipexole for two years, they helped alot but not for long. As the disease progressed my symptoms worsened, with my neurologist guidance i started on natural alternative PARKINSONS DISEASE treatment from R.H.F. (Rich Herbs Foundation), the treatment worked very effectively, my severe symptoms simply vanished, i feel better now than I have ever felt and i can feel my strength again. Visit ww w. richherbsfoundation. c om. My neurologist was very open when looking at alternative medicines and procedures, this alternative parkinson disease treatment is a breakthrough.

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