Study reveals benefits of yoga for pregnant women

July 18, 2018, Wiley
Credit: CC0 Public Domain

New research in pregnant women suggests that practicing yoga activates the parasympathetic nervous system (which is responsible for bodily functions when at rest) during the third trimester, improves sleep at night, and decreases α-amylase levels, indicating reduced stress.

The Journal of Obstetrics & Gynaecology Research study included 38 women in a yoga group and 53 in a .

"Yoga involves holding poses and repeating slow, long, deep breaths; maternity yoga encourages the participant to relax and become aware of both herself and the fetus, and it supports the initiation of parasympathetic nervous activity," the authors wrote.

Explore further: Yoga intervention ups sleep quality for staff nurses

More information: Journal of Obstetrics & Gynaecology Research, DOI: 10.1111/jog.13729

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