Women often unaware of their hospital's religious affiliation

July 12, 2018

(HealthDay)—Women of reproductive age are often unaware of their hospital's religious affiliation, according to a study recently published in Contraception.

Jocelyn M. Wascher, from the University of Chicago, and colleagues conducted a of women ages 18 to 45 years to assess what percentage of U.S. women seeking care at Catholic hospitals are aware of their hospital's .

The researchers found that 16 percent of women reported a Catholic hospital as their primary hospital for reproductive care. Nearly two-thirds of respondents whose primary hospital was Catholic correctly identified this, versus 93 percent of women who correctly identified their hospital as non-Catholic. Of women who misidentified their Catholic hospital's affiliation, two-thirds reported that their hospital was secular, with nearly half of these women feeling sure or very sure of their incorrect response. A religious-sounding name (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 2.80), respondent older age (aOR, 3.77), metropolitan residence (aOR, 3.35), and income over $100,000 (aOR, 4.95) were all factors associated with correctly identifying Catholic hospitals.

"Efforts are needed to increase transparency and patient awareness of the implications that arise when health care is restricted by religion," the authors write.

Explore further: Many US women don't realize they're seeking reproductive care at Catholic hospitals

More information: Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

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