How doctors receive feedback is key for antimicrobial programs

August 2, 2018

(HealthDay)—Anticipation of how providers will receive feedback is important for antimicrobial stewardship programs to consider in informing educational messaging, according to a study published online June 7 in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology.

Tara H. Lines, Pharm.D., from the Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville, Tenn., and colleagues conducted a 20-question survey of 211 inpatient providers to understand antimicrobial use (AU) attribution scenarios, feedback methods, and implementation barriers. The providers' specialties were critical care, emergency medicine, infectious diseases, medicine subspecialties, and surgery.

The researchers found that disagreement regarding AU attribution rose as AU scenarios became more complex. Respondents generally agreed on feedback methods, preferring electronic format, quarterly frequency, and grouped by similar services. Providers had a high level of concern about of quantitative AU data accounting for clinical care complexity, illness severity, and accuracy.

"Understanding provider opinions can improve acceptance, anticipate operational issues, and inform educational messaging," the authors write.

Explore further: Providers preferences may be helpful in reducing inappropriate antibiotic prescriptions

More information: Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

Providers preferences may be helpful in reducing inappropriate antibiotic prescriptions

June 7, 2018
Physicians are open to receiving information on their antibiotic prescribing patterns, but have specific preference for receiving that information, according to results from a study published today in Infection Control & ...

Patient, provider characteristics tied to unnecessary antibiotic Rx

February 5, 2018
(HealthDay)—Patient, practice, and provider characteristics are associated with inappropriate antimicrobial prescribing in the outpatient setting, according to a study published online Jan. 30 in Infection Control & Hospital ...

Many non-emergency medicine trained physicians in ER care

July 13, 2018
(HealthDay)—The emergency medicine workforce comprises many non-emergency medicine trained physicians, according to a study recently published in the Annals of Emergency Medicine.

Providing clinicians feedback on their opioid prescribing data alters future prescribing

May 7, 2018
Asking emergency department (ED) providers to self-identify their opioid prescribing practices and then providing them with timely, clinically relevant, individualized, and actionable feedback on their actual opioid prescribing ...

Docs' preparedness influences exercise recommendations

November 19, 2017
(HealthDay)—Primary care providers who feel prepared are more likely to recommend physical activity to patients with disabilities, according to a study published online Nov. 16 in Preventing Chronic Disease.

ADA issues recs for management of diabetes in primary care

March 3, 2016
(HealthDay)—New recommendations have been developed for diabetes, focusing on areas of importance for primary care providers. The clinical guideline was published online March 1 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Recommended for you

Juul e-cigarettes pose addiction risk for young users, study finds

October 19, 2018
Teens and young adults who use Juul brand e-cigarettes are failing to recognize the product's addictive potential, despite using it more often than their peers who smoke conventional cigarettes, according to a new study by ...

Adding refined fiber to processed food could have negative health effects

October 19, 2018
Adding highly refined fiber to processed foods could have negative effects on human health, such as promoting liver cancer, according to a new study by researchers at Georgia State University and the University of Toledo.

Self-lubricating latex could boost condom use: study

October 17, 2018
A perpetually unctuous, self-lubricating latex developed by a team of scientists in Boston could boost the use of condoms, they reported Wednesday in the journal Royal Society Open Science.

How healthy will we be in 2040?

October 17, 2018
A new scientific study of forecasts and alternative scenarios for life expectancy and major causes of death in 2040 shows all countries are likely to experience at least a slight increase in lifespans. In contrast, one scenario ...

Study finds evidence of intergenerational transmission of trauma among ex-POWs from the Civil War

October 16, 2018
A trio of researchers affiliated with the National Bureau of Economic Research has found evidence that suggests men who were traumatized while POWs during the U.S. Civil War transmitted that trauma to their offspring—many ...

Father's nicotine use can cause cognitive problems in children and grandchildren

October 16, 2018
A father's exposure to nicotine may cause cognitive deficits in his children and even grandchildren, according to a study in mice publishing on October 16 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology by Pradeep Bhide of Florida ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.