Bee venom may help treat eczema

September 6, 2018, Wiley
Honeybee (Apis mellifera) landing on a milk thistle flower (Silybum marianum). Credit: Fir0002/Flagstaffotos/ Wikipedia/GFDL v1.2

Bee venom and its major component, melittin, may be effective treatments for atopic dermatitis (or eczema), according to a British Journal of Pharmacology study.

Through studies conducted in mice and in human cells, investigators found that and melittin suppress inflammation through various mechanisms on immune cells and inflammatory molecules.

"This study demonstrated that bee venom and melittin have immunomodulatory activity, and such activity was associated with the regulation of T helper cell differentiation, thereby ameliorating the inflammatory skin diseases caused by ," the authors wrote.

Explore further: Researchers discover key driver of atopic dermatitis

More information: Hyun-Jin An et al, Therapeutic effects of bee venom and its major component, melittin, on atopic dermatitis in vivo and in vitro, British Journal of Pharmacology (2018). DOI: 10.1111/bph.14487

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