Swedish regulator ends investigation of birth control app

September 13, 2018
Swedish regulator ends investigation of birth control app
In this Friday, Aug. 17, 2018 file photo, a woman demonstrates using the Natural Cycles smartphone app, in London. Swedish regulators have closed their investigation of a birth control app after finding the rate of unwanted pregnancies was in line with clinical data. The Swedish Medical Products Agency said Thursday, Sept. 13 a review found about 7 percent of women using the Natural Cycles app got pregnant in the first half of the year. (AP Photo/Nishat Ahmed, File)

Swedish regulators have closed their investigation of a birth control app after finding that the rate of unwanted pregnancies, which had gained media attention, was actually in line with clinical data.

The Swedish Medical Products Agency said Thursday a review found about 7 percent of women using the Natural Cycles app got pregnant in the first half of the year, equal to the "typical use" failure rate in the clinical study submitted for its European certification.

Authorities launched the probe after reports of drew attention to the Swedish startup.

Natural Cycles last month became the first ever digital contraceptive device to win U.S. Food and Drug Administration marketing approval, underscoring the rapid rise of mobile health applications.

Britain's advertising regulator ruled in August that the company's Facebook ad contained misleading claims.

Explore further: UK regulator says ad for birth control app were misleading

Related Stories

UK regulator says ad for birth control app were misleading

August 29, 2018
Britain's advertising regulator says a birth control app's Facebook advertisement contained misleading claims that breached the country's advertising code.

Birth control app highlights emerging health tech market

August 17, 2018
The condom, the pill and now, the smartphone?

European regulator launches review of recalled heart drug

August 2, 2018
The European Medicines Agency (EMA) said Thursday it is conducting a review of the health effects on patients of a widely used blood pressure medication recalled around the world last month.

Women choose more effective contraception when cost not an issue

March 15, 2018
When cost isn't an issue, women will choose more effective, long-term methods of contraception, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers.

FDA clears first new tobacco products under federal pathway

November 10, 2015
The Food and Drug Administration has cleared the first new tobacco products for the U.S. market, under a system authorized more than 5 years ago.

Recommended for you

RNAi therapy mitigates preeclampsia symptoms

November 19, 2018
A collaboration of scientists from the University of Massachusetts Medical School, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Western Sydney University, have shown that an innovative new type of therapy using small interfering ...

Emotional abuse may be linked with menopause misery

November 19, 2018
Smoking, obesity and a sedentary lifestyle have long been linked to heightened symptoms of menopause. Now, a study headed by UC San Francisco has identified another factor that may add to menopause torment: an emotionally ...

New blood test detects early stage ovarian cancer

November 19, 2018
Research on a bacterial toxin first discovered in Adelaide has led to the development a new blood test for the early diagnosis of ovarian cancer—a disease which kills over 1000 Australian women and 150,000 globally each ...

How AI could help veterinarians code their notes

November 19, 2018
A team led by scientists at the School of Medicine has developed an algorithm that can read the typed-out notes from veterinarians and predict specific diseases that the animal may have.

Bullying and violence at work increases the risk of cardiovascular disease

November 19, 2018
People who are bullied at work or experience violence at work are at higher risk of heart and brain blood vessel problems, including heart attacks and stroke, according to the largest prospective study to investigate the ...

A low-gluten, high-fiber diet may be healthier than gluten-free

November 16, 2018
When healthy people eat a low-gluten and fibre-rich diet compared with a high-gluten diet, they experience less intestinal discomfort including less bloating. Researchers at University of Copenhagen show that this is due ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.