Swedish regulator ends investigation of birth control app

September 13, 2018
Swedish regulator ends investigation of birth control app
In this Friday, Aug. 17, 2018 file photo, a woman demonstrates using the Natural Cycles smartphone app, in London. Swedish regulators have closed their investigation of a birth control app after finding the rate of unwanted pregnancies was in line with clinical data. The Swedish Medical Products Agency said Thursday, Sept. 13 a review found about 7 percent of women using the Natural Cycles app got pregnant in the first half of the year. (AP Photo/Nishat Ahmed, File)

Swedish regulators have closed their investigation of a birth control app after finding that the rate of unwanted pregnancies, which had gained media attention, was actually in line with clinical data.

The Swedish Medical Products Agency said Thursday a review found about 7 percent of women using the Natural Cycles app got pregnant in the first half of the year, equal to the "typical use" failure rate in the clinical study submitted for its European certification.

Authorities launched the probe after reports of drew attention to the Swedish startup.

Natural Cycles last month became the first ever digital contraceptive device to win U.S. Food and Drug Administration marketing approval, underscoring the rapid rise of mobile health applications.

Britain's advertising regulator ruled in August that the company's Facebook ad contained misleading claims.

Explore further: UK regulator says ad for birth control app were misleading

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