Men suffer from long-lasting atypical employment

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Men who experience more spells of atypical employment during their first six years of labor market participation report worse self-rated health, new research has shown.

Interdisciplinary cooperation of Ioana van Deurzen (Tilburg School of Social and Behavioral Sciences) and Sonja Bekker (Tilburg Law School) has resulted in a publication on the relationship between the accumulation of atypical employment such as temporary contracts or , and the health of Dutch early career workers.

Van Deurzen and Bekker followed four cohorts of Dutch early career workers that entered the labor market in 2002, 2004, 2006 and 2008 for a period of six years. They conclude that men but not women who experience more spells of atypical employment during their first six years of participation report worse self-rated health.

More research is needed to understand why men's self-rated health is lower. Is it because of a prevailing breadwinner model that makes men responsible for a sustainable household income? Or should we measure in different ways to understand the effect of long-lasting atypical on women?


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More information: Ioana van Deurzen et al. Who suffers from the cumulation of atypical employment? A longitudinal analysis based on Dutch data, European Journal of Public Health (2018). DOI: 10.1093/eurpub/cky261
Provided by Tilburg University
Citation: Men suffer from long-lasting atypical employment (2018, December 14) retrieved 14 August 2020 from https://medicalxpress.com/news/2018-12-men-long-lasting-atypical-employment.html
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