CDC: Heart attack awareness improved since 2008

CDC: heart attack awareness improved since 2008
(HealthDay)—Since 2008, there has been an increase in the number of U.S. adults with awareness of heart attack symptoms and knowledge of the appropriate response to a heart attack, according to research published in the Feb. 8 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

Jing Fang, M.D., from the CDC in Atlanta, and colleagues analyzed data from the National Health Interview Survey to assess changes in awareness of heart attack symptoms and knowledge of the appropriate response to an apparent heart attack among U.S. adults in 2008, 2014, and 2017.

The researchers found that from 2008 to 2014 and 2017, there was an increase in the adjusted percentage of persons who knew all five common heart attack symptoms (jaw, neck, or back discomfort; weakness or lightheadedness; chest discomfort; arm or shoulder discomfort; and shortness of breath), from 39.6 to 50.0 and 50.2 percent, respectively. There was also an increase in the adjusted percentage of adults who knew to call 9-1-1 if someone was having a heart attack, from 91.8 to 93.4 and 94.9 percent, respectively, from 2008 to 2014 and 2017. Persistent disparities were seen in awareness of heart attack symptoms based on demographic characteristics and cardiovascular risk groups.

"General knowledge about the symptoms of a remain suboptimal," the authors write. "Consistent messaging campaigns should be complemented with regular contact with a because screening and evaluation might lead to early intervention."


Explore further

What to do if you think you're having a heart attack

More information: Abstract/Full Text

Copyright © 2019 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Citation: CDC: Heart attack awareness improved since 2008 (2019, February 11) retrieved 22 April 2019 from https://medicalxpress.com/news/2019-02-cdc-heart-awareness.html
This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.
1 shares

Feedback to editors

User comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more