Alzheimer's Research UK

Alzheimer's Research UK is the United Kingdom's leading dementia research charity, founded in 1992 as the Alzheimer's Research Trust. In February 2011 Alzheimer's Research Trust renamed as the Alzheimer's Research UK. It is dedicated to funding scientific studies to find ways to treat, cure or prevent Alzheimer's disease, vascular dementia, Lewy Body disease and fronto-temporal dementia. Alzheimer's Research UK currently funds 127 research projects across the UK and has committed nearly £40million to dementia research. Alzheimer's Research UK is a member of the Association of Medical Research Charities. Alzheimer's Research UK does not receive any government funding and instead relies on donations from individuals, companies and charitable trusts, money raised by individuals and gifts left in people's Wills to fund dementia research. The charity was founded by four members of the public as a result of their deep concerns at the lack of funding for Alzheimer's research. In 1998, the Trust awarded its first first major grant of £500,000 to a team led by distinguished scientist Dr Michel Goedert in Cambridge.

Website
http://www.alzheimersresearchuk.org/
Wikipedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alzheimer%27s_Research_UK

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Alzheimer's disease & dementia

Experience of racism linked with poorer memory and thinking

Research presented today (Monday 1 August) at the 2022 Alzheimer's Association International Conference (AAIC) in San Diego across two presentations suggest people who experience racism are more likely to have poor memory ...

Alzheimer's disease & dementia

Study: Gut health plays a role in Alzheimer's development

A series of experiments presented today at the Alzheimer's Research UK 2022 Conference at the Brighton Centre, has implicated the health of the gut in the development of Alzheimer's disease.

Neuroscience

Dementia protein changes discovered in terminal childhood disease

In a world-first, researchers at Newcastle University have found that the brains of infants who sadly passed away with an extremely rare genetic condition, Krabbe disease, have similar changes to those seen in two age-related ...

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