Cancer Research UK

Cancer Research UK is a cancer research and awareness charity in the United Kingdom, formed on 4 February 2002 by the merger of The Cancer Research Campaign and the Imperial Cancer Research Fund. Its aim is to reduce the number of deaths from cancer. As the world's largest independent cancer research charity it conducts research into the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of the disease. Research activities are carried out in institutes, universities and hospitals across the UK, both by the charity's own employees and by its grant-funded researchers. It also provides information about cancer and runs campaigns aimed at raising awareness of the disease and influencing public policy. Cancer Research UK's work is entirely funded by the public. It raises money through donations, legacies, community fundraising, events, retail and corporate partnerships. Over 40,000 people are regular volunteers.

Website
http://www.cancerresearchuk.org/
Wikipedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cancer_Research_UK

Some content from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA

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Obstetrics & gynaecology

Excess weight almost doubles risk of womb cancer

New research shows that lifelong excess weight almost doubles a woman's risk of developing womb cancer, according to a Cancer Research UK-funded study published today in BMC Medicine.

Oncology & Cancer

First data in a decade highlights ethnic disparities in cancer

Cancer Research UK's latest analysis of NHS Digital cancer registration data uses the most complete recording to date of cancer rates by ethnicity in England, providing crucial data on how some cancer rates vary by ethnicity. ...

Oncology & Cancer

Scientists trial new way to boost CAR T-cell therapy

Cancer Research UK is collaborating with Aleta Biotherapeutics (Aleta) to trial a new therapy that 'reboots' a treatment for some people with blood cancer whose cancer starts to come back.

Oncology & Cancer

Let's talk about HPV: 6 common questions answered

Talking about a virus is all a lot of us seem to be doing at the moment. We're happy enough chatting away about COVID-19 and other common viruses like the cold or flu, so why is there so little conversation about HPV?

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