Emory University

Emory University was founded in 1836 as a private university and affiliated with the United Methodist Episcopal Church. In the 1915 with the help of Asa Chandler founder of the Coca Cola Company Emory University expanded its presence in the Atlanta, Georgia area. Since this time Emory University has flourished with funds from its endowments, a large grant funding base and active alumni association. Emory University has an expansive medical center for teaching, research and patient care. The undergraduate and graduate schools have a student body in excess of 12,000 students. Emory University is comprised of nine schools including law, medicine, public health, nursing and noteworthy Oxford College. Emory University is a proximate neighbor of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the American Heart Association. The graduate school has degree programs in 26 divisions Emory's 2012 graduating class will be comprised of 43-percent students who identify with one or more minority groups. Emory welcomes students of every religious faith. Emory University is reported to have undergone a name change in 2008 to College of Arts & Sciences. U.S. News and World Report rank Emory University in the 100 Universities in the USA.

Address
1762 Clifton Road, Plaza 1000, Atlanta, Ga., 30322.
Website
http://www.emory.edu/home
Wikipedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emory_University

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