London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine

The London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine (informally the LSHTM or the London School) is a constituent college of the federal University of London specialised in public health and tropical medicine. Founded by Sir Patrick Manson in 1899, the LSHTM is a research-led postgraduate centre of excellence in public health, international health and tropical medicine. The LSHTM's mission is to contribute to the improvement of health worldwide through the pursuit of excellence in research, postgraduate teaching and advanced training in national and international public health and tropical medicine, and through informing policy and practice in these areas. The LSHTM had a total income of £101.7 million in 2009/10, of which £62.5 million was from research grants and contracts. The School was founded in 1899 by Sir Patrick Manson as the London School of Tropical Medicine and located at the Albert Dock Seamen's Hospital in the London Docklands. Just prior to this teaching in tropical medicine had been commenced in 1899 at the Extramural School at Edinburgh and even earlier at London's Livingstone College founded in 1893 by Charles F. Harford-Battersby (1865–1925).

Website
http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/
Wikipedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/London_School_of_Hygiene_%26_Tropical_Medicine

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Oncology & Cancer

Bereaved individuals may face higher risk of dying from melanoma

Individuals who experience the loss of a partner are less likely to be diagnosed with melanoma but face an increased risk of dying from the disease, according to research published in the British Journal of Dermatology.

Immunology

Atopic eczema linked to increase fracture risk in adults

Involving the health records of three million adults in the UK, the study, led by the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, is the largest to date examining the relationship between atopic eczema and fractures, and ...

Pediatrics

Intervention can boost rates of exclusive breastfeeding

Interventions which educate and support new mothers in West Africa to exclusively breastfeed (where infants are only fed breast milk) can significantly increase the practice, according to new research published in The Lancet ...

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