Swansea University

Swansea University (Welsh: Prifysgol Abertawe) is a university located in Swansea, Wales, United Kingdom. Swansea University was chartered as University College of Swansea in 1920, as the fourth college of the University of Wales. In 1996, it changed its name to the University of Wales Swansea following structural changes within the University of Wales. The new title of Swansea University was formally adopted on 1 September 2007 when the University of Wales became a non-membership confederal institution and the former members became universities in their own right. It is the third largest university in Wales in terms of number of students. The university campus is located next to the coast at the north of Swansea Bay, east of the Gower Peninsula, in the grounds of Singleton Park, just outside Swansea city centre. Swansea was granted its own degree-awarding powers in 2005 in preparation for possible changes within the University of Wales.

Address
Singleton Park Campus: Swansea University Singleton Park Swansea SA2 8PP Wales, UK Bay Campus: Swansea University Fabian Way Crymlyn Burrows Swansea SA1 8EN Wales, UK
Website
http://www.swansea.ac.uk/

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Vaccination

Vaccines through microneedle skin patches

A revolutionary new way to give vaccines through microneedle skin patches is being tested at Swansea University, thanks to £200,000 of EU funding announced by the Welsh Government.

Autism spectrum disorders

Online tools can improve autism diagnosis

Online tools and assessments can help speed up diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder (ASD), the first comprehensive survey of research in the field has concluded.

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Double success for drug resistance research

Swansea University research into the threat posed by antifungal drug resistance has been highlighted in two prestigious international journals.

Oncology & Cancer

A quicker answer on cancer, with waits cut from 84 days to 6

A rapid diagnosis centre has cut waiting times for patients with non-specific symptoms who may have cancer from 84 days to 6, and costs less than current usual care if used at more than 80% of capacity, a new study by Swansea ...

Pediatrics

Girls more likely to be hospitalised after self-harm than boys

Girls in Wales who have self harmed are significantly more likely than boys to be admitted to hospital, after turning up for emergency care, finds the first study of its kind, published online in the Archives of Disease in ...

Medications

Academics call for structured drug monitoring in care homes

Professor Sue Jordan from the University's College of Human and Health Sciences led the research which is newly published in the PLOS ONE journal. The study showed how care home residents' adverse side effects were picked ...

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