Umea University

Umeå University (Swedish: Umeå universitet) is a university in Umeå in the mid-northern region of Sweden. The university was founded in 1965 and is the fifth oldest within Sweden's present borders. During the seventies the university became known as the "red university" due to a large number of student strikes and a large share of left-wing politically active students. Since then conditions have normalised and Umeå University now has over 15,500 full-time students, including master students. It has more than 4,000 employees, including 332 full professors. Internationally, the university is known for research relating to the genome of the Populus tree (Life sciences), contributions to the Gleason problem and function spaces on fractals (mathematics) and its school of industrial design which gives degree programs in English open to students from all of the world. It is also the one of largest providers of distance education courses in the Nordic countries.

Address
Umeå, Västerbotten County
Website
http://www.umu.se/english
Wikipedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ume%C3%A5_University

Some content from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA

Subscribe to rss feed

Plants & Animals

Mammals can breathe through anus in emergencies

Rodents and pigs share with certain aquatic organisms the ability to use their intestines for respiration, finds a study publishing May 14th in the journal Med. The researchers demonstrated that the delivery of oxygen gas ...

Environment

Fibre-optics used to take the temperature of Greenland Ice Sheet

Scientists have used fibre-optic sensing to obtain the most detailed measurements of ice properties ever taken on the Greenland Ice Sheet. Their findings will be used to make more accurate models of the future movement of ...

Earth Sciences

Observations show marine clouds amplify warming

A new analysis of satellite cloud observations finds that global warming causes low-level clouds over the oceans to decrease, leading to further warming. The work, led by researchers at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory ...

Molecular & Computational biology

Researchers trace path of light in photosynthesis

Three billion years ago, light first zipped through chlorophyll within tiny reaction centers, the first step plants and photosynthetic bacteria take to convert light into food.

Nanophysics

Advance may enable 2D transistors for tinier microchip components

Moore's Law, the famous prediction that the number of transistors that can be packed onto a microchip will double every couple of years, has been bumping into basic physical limits. These limits could bring decades of progress ...

page 1 from 17