University of Georgia

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Researchers analyzing coronavirus genome to develop vaccine

A team of researchers at the University of Georgia are developing and testing new vaccines and immunotherapies to combat the novel coronavirus that has infected hundreds of thousands across the world.

Medical research

'Natural killer' cells could halt Parkinson's progression

Researchers at the University of Georgia's Regenerative Bioscience Center and their colleagues have found that "natural killer" white blood cells could guard against the cascade of cellular changes that lead to Parkinson's ...

Medications

Research offers promise for treating schizophrenia

Research by a University of Georgia psychologist shows that targeting one particular symptom of schizophrenia has a positive effect on other symptoms, offering significant promise for treating an aspect of schizophrenia that ...

Pediatrics

Women still face barriers to breastfeed at work

Despite the protections in place to support breastfeeding for employees, the burden still falls on working mothers to advocate for the resources they need, according to a new study from the University of Georgia.

Medical research

Exosomes promote remarkable recovery in stroke

It's been almost a quarter century since the first drug was approved for stroke. But what's even more striking is that only a single drug remains approved today.

Neuroscience

To the brain, straight from the vein: IV treatment for TBI

A team of researchers from the University of Georgia's Regenerative Bioscience Center has found that neural exosomes—"cargo" molecules within the nervous system that carry messages to the brain—can minimize or even avert ...

Medical research

Virtual reality could help flu vaccination rates

Using a virtual reality simulation to show how flu spreads and its impact on others could be a way to encourage more people to get a flu vaccination, according to a study by researchers at the University of Georgia and the ...

Medications

Think you're allergic to penicillin? You are probably wrong

More than 30 million people in the United States wrongly believe they are allergic to penicillin—resulting in millions of dollars in added health care costs, adverse side effects from the use of more powerful antibiotics ...

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