Washington University School of Medicine

Neuroscience

How a light touch can spur severe itching

For some people, particularly those who are elderly, even a light touch of the skin or contact with clothing can lead to unbearable itching. What's worse, anti-itch treatments, including hydrocortisone, don't provide much ...

Immunology

Psoriasis treated with compound derived from immune cells

A compound derived from immune cells treats psoriasis in mice and holds promise for other autoimmune diseases, according to a new study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.

Medical research

New clues point to relief for chronic itching

A common side effect of opioids is intense itching—a problem for some patients who need the drugs for pain relief and for others fighting addiction.

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

How highly contagious norovirus infection gets its start

Norovirus—the highly contagious gastrointestinal illness best known for spreading rapidly on cruise chips, in nursing homes, schools and other densely populated spaces—kills an estimated 200,000 people annually, mostly ...

Cancer

Major milestone reached in effort to ID cancers' genetic roots

Researchers nationwide have reached a major milestone in describing the genetic landscape of cancer. Scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and other institutions have completed the genetic sequencing ...

Immunology

Macular degeneration linked to aging immune cells

As people age, their immune systems age, too. And new research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis suggests that aging immune cells increase the risk for age-related macular degeneration, a major cause ...

Cancer

For women with kidney cancer, belly fat matters

Belly fat affects the odds of women surviving kidney cancer but not men, according to a new study by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.

Neuroscience

Slow, steady waves keep brain humming

If you keep a close eye on an MRI scan of the brain, you'll see a wave pass through the entire brain like a heartbeat once every few seconds. This ultra-slow rhythm was recognized decades ago, but no one quite knew what to ...

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